The Wheelwright’s Shop Cambridge University Press George Sturt

George Sturt’s frank and moving account of his trade as a wheelwright in the late nineteenth century offers a unique glimpse into the working lives of craftsmen in a world since banished by technology. The wheelwright’s shop where he entered business had been operating for two centuries; this chronicle, first published in 1923, is a […]

The Cold War and the United States Information Agency: American Propaganda and Public Diplomacy 1945-1989 Cambridge University Press Nicholas J. Cull

Published at a time when the U.S. government’s public diplomacy is in crisis, this book provides an exhaustive account of how it used to be done. The United States Information Agency was created in 1953 to “tell America’s story to the world” and, by engaging with the world through international information, broadcasting, culture and exchange […]

Story Performance and Event: Contextual Studies of Oral Narrative Cambridge University Press Richard Bauman

Based on a corpus of Texan oral narratives collected by the author over the past fifteen years, this study presents an analysis of the literary qualities or orally performed verbal art, focusing on the significance of its social context. Although the tales included are all from Texas, they are representative of oral storytelling traditions in […]

The Hellenistic World from Alexander to the Roman Conquest: A Selection of Ancient Sources in Translation Cambridge University Press M. M. Austin

The aim of this book is to collect in one volume a substantial and representative selection of ancient sources in translation, with commentary, on the history, institutions, society and economic life of the Hellenistic world from the reign of Alexander the Great to the late second century BC – that is, from when the Greek […]

Fatal Self-Deception: Slaveholding Paternalism in the Old South Cambridge University Press Eugene D. Genovese

Slaveholders were preoccupied with presenting slavery as a benign, paternalistic institution in which the planter took care of his family, and slaves were content with their fate. In this book, Eugene D. Genovese and Elizabeth Fox-Genovese discuss how slaveholders perpetuated and rationalized this romanticized version of life on the plantation. Slaveholders’ paternalism had little to […]

Myth Literature and the African World Cambridge University Press Wole Soyinka

Wole Soyinka, winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature and one of the foremost living African writers, here analyses the interconnecting worlds of myth, ritual and literature in Africa. The ways in which the African world perceives itself as a cultural entity, and the differences between its essential unity of experience and literary form and […]

Visionary Republic: Millennial Themes in American Thought 1756-1800 Cambridge University Press Ruth H. Bloch

An account of the role of millennial thinking in the age of the American Revolution, this book demonstrates the popularity and diffusion of millennial expectations among several types of American Protestants by the middle of the eighteenth century and illuminates the way these hopes shaped the understanding of the Revolution and the symbolic meaning of […]

Subjectivity in Troubadour Poetry Cambridge University Press Sarah Kay

The medieval troubadours of the South of France profoundly influenced European literature for many centuries. This book is the first full-length study of the first-person subject position adopted by many of them in its relation to language and society. Using modern theoretical approaches, Sarah Kay discusses to what extent this first person is a “self” […]

The Renaissance of Lesbianism in Early Modern England Cambridge University Press Valerie Traub

Valerie Traub analyzes the representation of female-female love, desire, and eroticism in a range of early modern discourses, including poetry, drama, visual arts, pornography, and medicine. Contrary to the silence ascribed to lesbianism in the Renaissance, Traub argues that the early modern period witnessed an unprecedented proliferation of representations of such desire. As a contribution […]

The Cambridge Companion to F. Scott Fitzgerald Cambridge University Press Ruth Prigozy

Specially-commissioned essays by major scholars present a clear and comprehensive assessment of F. Scott Fitzgerald. No aspect of his career is overlooked–from his first novel published in 1920, through his more than 170 short stories, to his last unfinished Hollywood novel. Contributions present the reader with an accessible picture of the background of American social […]