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The Year’s Best Science Fiction Seventeenth Annual Collection St. Martin’s Griffin 1st edition Gardner Dozois


9th July 2013 Literature & Fiction 0 Comments

In science fiction’s early days, stories often looked past 1984 to the year 2000 as the far unknowable future. Here now, on the brink of the twenty-first century, the future remains as distant and as unknowable as ever . . . and science fiction stories continue to explore it with delightful results:

Collected in this anthology are such imaginative gems as:

“The Wedding Album” by David Marusek. In a high-tech future, the line between reality and simulation has grown thin . . . and it’s often hard to tell who’s on what side.

“Everywhere” by Geoff Ryman. Do the people who live in utopian conditions ever recognize them as such?

“Hatching the Phoenix” by Frederik Pohl. One of science fiction’s Grand Masters returns with a star-crossing tale of the Heechee—the enigmatic, vanished aliens whose discarded technology guides mankind through the future.

“A Hero of the Empire” by Robert Silverberg. Showing that the past is as much a province of the imagination as the future, this novelette returns to an alternate history when the Roman Empire never fell to show us just how the course of history can be altered.

The twenty-seven stories in this collection imaginatively take us to nearby planets and distant futures, into the past and into universes no larger than a grain of sand. Included here are the works of masters of the form and of bright new talents.

Supplementing the stories are the editor’s insightful summation of the year’s events and a lengthy list of honorable mentions, making this book a valuable resource in addition to serving as the single best place in the universe to find stories that stir the imagination and the heart.

As in previous volumes in this series, Dozois, who has won the Hugo for Best Editor 11 times, again presents a large helping of stellar short SF. Nine of the 27 stories are, quite appropriately, from his own magazine, Asimov’s, which continues to dominate the various genre awards. Dozois also includes four stories each from Fantasy and Science Fiction and the British Interzone. Also represented are Analog, Amazing, Science Fiction Age, and two semi-pro magazines, Absolute Magnitude and the Australian Altair, as well as such original anthologies as Moon Shots, Not of Women Born and the Canadian Tesseracts. Among the high points are two time-travel pieces, Kage Baker’s story of San Francisco before the great earthquake, “Son Observe the Time,” and Michael Swanwick’s pre-historic time-paradox tale, “Scherzo with Tyrannosaurus”; Eleanor Arnason’s understated story of alien gender-role reversal, “Dapple”; Kim Stanley Robinson’s “A Martian Romance,” which is set not in the world of his Mars trilogy but in a subtly alternate universe; and Greg Egan’s “Border Guards,” hard-SF that imagines a future in which immortality is a given and soccer is played using the principles of quantum physics. Also included is quality fiction by such luminaries of the field as James Patrick Kelly, Frederik Pohl, Ben Bova, Robert Silverberg and Paul McAuley, plus such rising stars as David Marusek, Alastair Reynolds and Sage Walker. As usual, the anthology begins with a detailed survey of the year in SF and ends with a long list of Honorable Mentions. Dozois’s annual volume remains a standard by which the field of SF should be judged. (July)
Copyright 2000 Reed Business Information, Inc. –This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From David Marusek’s tale of a future where reality’s borders collide with the unreal (“The Wedding Album”) to Kage Baker’s latest novella featuring the time-traveling “Company” (“Son Observe the Time”), the 27 stories in this annual collection bear witness to the vitality of the sf short story. Including tales by Tanith Lee, Frederick Pohl, Hal Clement, Michael Swanwick, and others, this volume displays the best and brightest of the genre to good advantage. Suitable for most sf or short story collections.
Copyright 2000 Reed Business Information, Inc.

The Year’s Best Science Fiction, Seventeenth Annual Collection










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