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The Enlightenment Dorinda Outram Cambridge University Press 2 edition


31st January 2012 History Books 0 Comments

‘… this is a wide-ranging and useful survey of the field.’ Norman Hampson, Modern and Contemporary France

Debate over the meaning of ‘Enlightenment’ began in the eighteenth century and has continued unabated until our own times. This period saw the opening of arguments on the nature of man, truth, on the place of God, and the international circulation of ideas, people and gold. The second edition of this unique textbook offers a fresh introduction, a new chapter on slavery, and new material on the Enlightenment as a global phenomenon. The book will prove invaluable reading to students of eighteenth century history, philosophy, and the history of ideas.

Debate over the meaning of ‘Enlightenment’ began in the eighteenth century and has continued unabated until our own times. This period saw the emergence of arguments on the nature of man, truth, the place of God, and the international circulation of ideas, people and gold. In the second edition of her book, Dorinda Outram studies the Enlightenment as a global phenomenon, comparing it against the period’s broader social changes. The new edition also features a new introduction and chapter on slavery, and the bibliography and short biographies have been extended.

‘… this is a wide-ranging and useful survey of the field.’ Norman Hampson, Modern and Contemporary France

The Enlightenment (New Approaches to European History)

Eighteenth-Century Europe: Tradition and Progress, 1715-1789

Isser Woloch is the Moore Collegiate Professor Emeritus at Columbia University. His publications include The New Regime: Transformations of the French Civic Order, 1789-1820s, which won the Leo Gershoy Award of the American Historical Association.

The three-quarters of a century between 1715 and 1789 are often seen as the last years of Europe’s old order. But a dramatic rise in Europe’s population, the agricultural and industrial revolutions in Britain, and the unprecedented challenges of the Enlightenment began to shake the foundations of the old regime well before 1789.

Drawing on the best contemporary scholarship, especially the innovations of French social history, Isser Woloch paints an unusually rich and detailed portrait of eighteenth-century European life and society. Among the new topics he covers are the family economy of the poor, popular culture and the circulation of books, changing patterns of crime and punishment, and the social history of military and religious institutions.

Eighteenth-Century Europe: Tradition and Progress, 1715-1789 (The Norton History of Modern Europe)










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