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The 1960s: A Documentary Reader Brian Ward WileyBlackwell 1 edition


30th November 2011 History Books 1 Comment

Ward has crafted a cool, clever, and incisive Sixties reader. . . . Pedagogically sophisticated and thought-provoking, this reader gives instructors an invaluable tool as it gives students a wide-ranging tour of Sixties politics and culture.
David Farber, Temple University, author of The Age of Great Dreams: America in the 1960s

“With his thoughtful introduction and excellent selection of documents, Brian Ward has done an outstanding job of bringing to life the complexities and contradictions of the era.”
Kevin M. Kruse, Princeton University, author of White Flight: Atlanta and the Making of Modern Conservatism

Ward recaptures much of the variety, vitality, and energy of the 1960s. . . . Taken together these documents bring back the sometimes raucous, mostly contentious, but never dull era we call the 60s. Wards fine and incisive introduction puts the discordant parts into a coherent context.
Mark Lytle, Bard College, author of America’s Uncivil Wars: The Sixties Era from Elvis to the Fall of Richard Nixon

This brilliant collage of political and cultural documents brings the 1960s back to life as presidents, activists, musicians, and social critics from the left and right offer competing visions of national purpose and American identity. An extraordinary teaching resource.
Matthew D. Lassiter, University of Michigan, author of The Silent Majority: Suburban Politics in the Sunbelt South

Drawn from a wide range of perspectives and showcasing a variety of primary source materials, Brian Wards The 1960s: A Documentary Reader includes over 50 primary documents and highlights the most important themes of the era. Cumulatively, the speeches, court decisions, acts of Congress, secret memos, song lyrics, cartoons, photographs, news reports, advertisements, and first-hand testimony collected in this reader take students from the New Left to the New Right, from Vietnam to Woodstock, from suburbia to the moon, and from evangelicals to environmentalists.

With headnotes that place each text into historical context and an introduction that examines the difficulties historians face when confronted with an abundance of diverse, often contradictory, evidence, The 1960s offers students a sophisticated introduction to this most beguiling yet elusive of decades.

Drawn from a wide range of perspectives and showcasing a variety of primary source materials, Brian Wards The 1960s: A Documentary Reader highlights the most important themes of the era. Supplies students with over 50 primary documents on the turbulent period of the 1960s in the United StatesIncludes speeches, court decisions, acts of Congress, secret memos, song lyrics, cartoons, photographs, news reports, advertisements, and first-hand testimonyA comprehensive introduction, document headnotes, and questions at the end of each chapter are designed to encourage students to engage with the material critically

Ward has crafted a cool, clever, and incisive Sixties reader. . . . Pedagogically sophisticated and thought-provoking, this reader gives instructors an invaluable tool as it gives students a wide-ranging tour of Sixties politics and culture.
David Farber, Temple University, author of The Age of Great Dreams: America in the 1960s

“With his thoughtful introduction and excellent selection of documents, Brian Ward has done an outstanding job of bringing to life the complexities and contradictions of the era.”
Kevin M. Kruse, Princeton University, author of White Flight: Atlanta and the Making of Modern Conservatism

Ward recaptures much of the variety, vitality, and energy of the 1960s. . . . Taken together these documents bring back the sometimes raucous, mostly contentious, but never dull era we call the 60s. Wards fine and incisive introduction puts the discordant parts into a coherent context.
Mark Lytle, Bard College, author of America’s Uncivil Wars: The Sixties Era from Elvis to the Fall of Richard Nixon

This brilliant collage of political and cultural documents brings the 1960s back to life as presidents, activists, musicians, and social critics from the left and right offer competing visions of national purpose and American identity. An extraordinary teaching resource.
Matthew D. Lassiter, University of Michigan, author of The Silent Majority: Suburban Politics in the Sunbelt South

The 1960s: A Documentary Reader (Uncovering the Past: Documentary Readers in American History)

American Cinema of the 1960s: Themes and Variations

Barry Keith Grant is a professor in the Department of Communication, Popular Culture, and Film at Brock University in Ontario, Canada, and the author of numerous books.

The profound cultural and political changes of the 1960s brought the United States closer to social revolution than at any other time in the twentieth century. The country fragmented as various challenges to state power were met with increasing and violent resistance. The Cold War heated up and the Vietnam War divided Americans. Civil rights, women’s liberation, and gay rights further emerged as significant social issues. Free love was celebrated even as the decade was marked by assassinations, mass murders, and social unrest.

At the same time, American cinema underwent radical change as well. The studio system crumbled, and the Production Code was replaced by a new ratings system. Among the challenges faced by the film industry was the dawning shift in theatrical exhibition from urban centers to surburban multiplexes, an increase in runaway productions, the rise of independent producers, and competition from both television and foreign art films. Hollywood movies became more cynical, violent, and sexually explicit, reflecting the changing values of the time.

In ten original essays, American Cinema of the 1960s examines a range of films that characterized the decade, including Hollywood movies, documentaries, and independent and experimental films. Among the films discussed are Elmer Gantry, The Apartment, West Side Story, The Manchurian Candidate, To Kill a Mockingbird, Cape Fear, Bonnie and Clyde, 2001: A Space Odyssey, Midnight Cowbody, and Easy Rider.

American Cinema of the 1960s: Themes and Variations (Screen Decades: American Culture/American Cinema)










  • One response to "The 1960s: A Documentary Reader Brian Ward WileyBlackwell 1 edition"

  • J Byers
    2:11 on December 3rd, 2011
    Reply to comment

    Art imitates life, and art imitating the life of the 1960s was intriguing indeed. “American Cinema of the 1960s: Themes and Variations” brings a scholarly eye to the films of the 1960s and discusses the wide range of messages reflecting a wide range of messages that society was being exposed to and discussing at the time. Ten essays give intelligent insight on every thing from independent film to documentary to the big Hollywood films of the era. “American Cinema of the 1960s” is a microscope of the microscope that the films of the time served to be.

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