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Machiavelli’s God Princeton University Press Maurizio Viroli


14th December 2012 History Books 17 Comments
To many readers of The Prince, Machiavelli appears to be deeply un-Christian or even anti-Christian, a cynic who thinks rulers should use religion only to keep their subjects in check. But in Machiavelli's God, Maurizio Viroli, one of the world's leading authorities on Machiavelli, argues that Machiavelli, far from opposing Christianity, thought it was crucial to republican social and political renewal--but that first it needed to be renewed itself. And without understanding this, Viroli contends, it is impossible to comprehend Machiavelli's thought. Viroli places Machiavelli in the context ...
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Lower East Side Memories: A Jewish Place in America Princeton University Press Hasia R. Diner


26th November 2012 History Books 19 Comments
Manhattan's Lower East Side stands for Jewish experience in America. With the possible exception of African-Americans and Harlem, no ethnic group has been so thoroughly understood and imagined through a particular chunk of space. Despite the fact that most American Jews have never set foot there--and many come from families that did not immigrate through New York much less reside on Hester or Delancey Street--the Lower East Side is firm in their collective memory. Whether they have been there or not, people reminisce about the Lower East Side as the place where life pulsated, bread tasted ...
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The Satanic Epic Princeton University Press Neil Forsyth


22nd October 2012 History Books 2 Comments
The Satan of Paradise Lost has fascinated generations of readers. This book attempts to explain how and why Milton's Satan is so seductive. It reasserts the importance of Satan against those who would minimize the poem's sympathy for the devil and thereby make Milton orthodox.Neil Forsyth argues that William Blake got it right when he called Milton a true poet because he was "of the Devils party" even though he set out "to justify the ways of God to men." In seeking to learn why Satan is so alluring, Forsyth ranges over diverse topics--from the origins of evil and the relevance of witchcraft ...
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Between Citizens and the State: The Politics of American Higher Education in the 20th Century Princeton University Press Christopher P. Loss


22nd October 2012 History Books 4 Comments
This book tracks the dramatic outcomes of the federal government's growing involvement in higher education between World War I and the 1970s, and the conservative backlash against that involvement from the 1980s onward. Using cutting-edge analysis, Christopher Loss recovers higher education's central importance to the larger social and political history of the United States in the twentieth century, and chronicles its transformation into a key mediating institution between citizens and the state. Framed around the three major federal higher education policies of the twentieth century--the ...
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Weimar Germany: Promise and Tragedy Princeton University Press Eric D. Weitz


17th September 2012 History Books 14 Comments
Weimar Germany still fascinates us, and now this complex and remarkably creative period and place has the history it deserves. Eric Weitz's Weimar Germany reveals the Weimar era as a time of strikingly progressive achievements--and even greater promise. With a rich thematic narrative and detailed portraits of some of Weimar's greatest figures, this comprehensive history recaptures the excitement and drama as it unfolded, viewing Weimar in its own right--and not as a mere prelude to the Nazi era. Weimar Germany tells how Germans rose from the defeat of World War I and the turbulence of ...
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A Turn to Empire: The Rise of Imperial Liberalism in Britain and France Princeton University Press Jennifer Pitts


16th September 2012 History Books 3 Comments
A dramatic shift in British and French ideas about empire unfolded in the sixty years straddling the turn of the nineteenth century. As Jennifer Pitts shows in A Turn to Empire, Adam Smith, Edmund Burke, and Jeremy Bentham were among many at the start of this period to criticize European empires as unjust as well as politically and economically disastrous for the conquering nations. By the mid-nineteenth century, however, the most prominent British and French liberal thinkers, including John Stuart Mill and Alexis de Tocqueville, vigorously supported the conquest of non-European peoples. ...
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Eugene Onegin: A Novel in Verse Vol. 2 Princeton University Press Aleksandr Sergeevich Pushkin


1st September 2012 Literature & Fiction 16 Comments
This is the widely acclaimed translation of Russian literature's most seminal work. Pushkin's "novel in verse" has influenced Russian prose as well as poetry for more than a century. By turns brilliant, entertaining, romantic and serious, it traces the development of a young Petersburg dandy as he deals with life and love. Influeneced by Byron, Pushkin reveals the nature of his heroes through the emotional colorations found in their witty remarks, nature descriptions, and unexpected actions, all conveyed in stanzas of sonnet length (a form which became known as the Onegin Stanza), faithfully ...
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Who Cares?: Public Ambivalence and Government Activism from the New Deal to the Second Gilded Age Princeton University Press Katherine S. Newman


25th July 2012 History Books 0 Comments
Americans like to think that they look after their own, especially in times of hardship. Particularly for the Great Depression and the Great Society eras, the collective memory is one of solidarity and compassion for the less fortunate. Who Cares? challenges this story by examining opinion polls and letters to presidents from average citizens. This evidence, some of it little known, reveals a much darker, more impatient attitude toward the poor, the unemployed, and the dispossessed during the 1930s and 1960s. Katherine Newman and Elisabeth Jacobs show that some of the social policies that ...
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The Papers of Thomas Jefferson Volume 36: 1 December 1801 to 3 March 1802 Princeton University Press Thomas Jefferson


27th June 2012 History Books 0 Comments
The period covered by this volume brings to a conclusion Thomas Jefferson's first year as president. On 8 December he communicates his first annual message to Congress: peace between France and England is restored; a rise in population will increase revenue and help abolish internal taxes; the standing army can be done away with; "peace & friendship" prevail with Indian neighbors. He recommends two particular matters to the attention of Congress: a revision of the laws on naturalization and a review of the Judiciary Act. Two delegations of Indian nations hold conferences with Jefferson ...
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Economics and the Law Princeton University Press Steven G. Medema


26th June 2012 History Books 21 Comments
The last several decades have witnessed the development of diverse approaches to the evolving field of Law and Economics. Each school of thought within Law and Economics has helped both to redefine the study of law and to expose the important economic implications of the legal environment. Here, Nicholas Mercuro and Steven Medema present a valuable, concise overview of the current perspectives and varied traditions that constitute the field. The authors make clear that Law and Economics is not a homogeneous movement by deftly illuminating the several competing and yet complementary ...
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