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Slavery Race and the American Revolution Cambridge University Press Duncan J. MacLeod


2nd April 2012 History Books 1 Comment

This book analyses the impact of American Revolutionary ideology upon conceptions of the place of slavery in American society. The ambivalence involved in a libertarian revolution occurring in a slave society was as obvious to eighteenth-century Americans as it is to twentieth-century historians yet the obvious sincerity of Southern Republicanism and the persistence of slavery have presented a paradox with which historians have hardly come to terms.

This book analyses the impact of American Revolutionary ideology upon conceptions of the place of slavery in American society. The ambivalence involved in a libertarian revolution occurring in a slave society was as obvious to eighteenth-century Americans as it is to twentieth-century historians yet the obvious sincerity of Southern Republicanism and the persistence of slavery have presented a paradox with which historians have hardly come to terms.

Slavery, Race and the American Revolution










  • One response to "Slavery Race and the American Revolution Cambridge University Press Duncan J. MacLeod"

  • NEWTRAFFIC
    12:10 on April 2nd, 2012
    Reply to comment

    It should merit 3 stars alone just to have Prof. Waldstreicher actually come out with a book that people can read! His other works have been dreadfully written (esp. his work in Journal of the Early republic), the worst prose in the business. However, not only is this book very nicely written, for which he deserves commendation, but its also interesting. What Waldstreicher does is demostrate how labor inthe 1st half of the 18th century in America was quite often “unfree”: either due to slavery, indentured servitude or an apprenticeship. Waldstreicher’s contribution here si to show how BF’s life was marked by all three. He was an apprentice himself, kept Indentured servants and owned a slave or two. It is a great way to explore this issue of labor and freedom in the colonies, and to do so by using the life of a Founding Father.
    Given the subject and the prose, I have no reservations at all about rating this book 5 stars.

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