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Silent Warrior: The Marine Sniper’s Story Vietnam Continues Military Life & Institutions Charles Henderson Berkley


12th May 2012 History Books 48 Comments

Henderson, a retired Marine Corps officer, first told Hathcock’s Vietnam-and-aftermath stories in his highly readable, highly hagiographic Marine Sniper: 93 Confirmed Kills (1986), which continues to be a favorite item at the PX. Sniper detailed how U.S. Marine Corps Sgt. Carlos J. Hathcock II used his uncanny marksmanship in Vietnam to record more than 300 hits, and how he dragged six of his unconscious buddies away from a burning tank. After an arduous recovery from serious burns received then, Hathcock learned that he had multiple sclerosisAthe disease he succumbed to last year. Henderson frames Warrior by imagining what Hathcock was thinking on his deathbed. Waves of imagined dialogue, based on interviews Henderson conducted with Hathcock and with a raft of witnesses to his heroics, crash through page after page. The voices of former Vietcong and North Vietnamese soldiers, including the late Tran Van Tra, who commanded VC forces in South Vietnam, fill things out, along with Henderson himself. What he and the others say is sure to add to the Hathcock mythos and will thrill buffs and ex- and current servicemen alike. But few other readers will be able to countenance the overheated style and lack of journalistic care in sourcing the story, although Hathcock was doubtless an exemplary soldier. After an initial burst from fans of Sniper, whose sales it will revive, this book will sell steadily but probably less prolifically than its predecessor. (Oct.)
Copyright 2000 Reed Business Information, Inc. –This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Charles W. Henderson is a veteran of more than 23 years in the United States Marine Corps, with a distinguished career spanning from Vietnam to the Gulf War, after which he retired as a Chief Warrant Officer. His first book was the critically-acclaimed military classic Marine Sniper, which first chronicled the exploits of U.S.M.C. sniper Carlos Hathcock. He is also the author of Marshalling the Faithful. –This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

In 1986, Charles Henderson first published Marine Sniper-the incredible story of Gunnery Sergeant Carlos Hathcock, whose 93 confirmed kills in Vietnam have never been matched by any sniper before or since.

Now, the incredible story of a remarkable Marine continues-with harrowing, never-before-published accounts of courage and perseverance. These are the powerful stories of a man who rose to greatness not for personal gain or glory, but for duty and honor. A rare inside look at the U.S. Marine’s most challenging missions-and the one man who made military history.

Silent Warrior: The Marine Sniper’s Story Vietnam Continues

One Shot One Kill

Charles W. Sasser has been a full-time freelance writer, journalist, and photographer since 1979. He is a veteran of both the U.S. Navy (journalist) and U.S. Army (Special Forces, the Green Berets), a combat veteran and former combat correspondent wounded in action. He also served fourteen years as a police officer (in Miami, Florida, and in Tulsa, Oklahoma, where he was a homicide detective). He is author, co-author or contributing author of more than 30 books and novels, including One Shot-One Kill and Hill 488, both available from Pocket Books. Sasser now lives on a ranch in Chouteau, Oklahoma, with his wife Donna.

Craig Roberts retired from the armed forces in 1999 with 30 years total service. He was awarded ten decorations for his Marine Corps service in Vietnam, where he served as a Marine sniper. He was also a career police officer with the Tulsa, Oklahoma, police department. An internationally published writer, he is the author of Combat Medic-Vietnam and Police Sniper, as well as the co-author of One Shot-One Kill, and The Walking Dead.

They are the lone wolves of the battlefield. Tracking the enemy, lying in wait for the target to appear — then they shoot to kill. Armed with an unerring eye, infinite patience and a mastery of camouflage, combat snipers stalk the enemy with only one goal…

In World War II, Korea, Vietnam, and Beirut, American snipers honed the art of delivering a single deadly shot from nowhere — and devastating enemy morale. They met the enemy on his own turf, picking off officers, unwary soldiers, and even other snipers from extraordinary distances of up to 1 ½ miles. Now, these uncommon men tell their stories: of the emotions felt when a man’s face came into their crosshairs and they pulled the trigger, of the nerve-wracking hours and days of waiting, motionless, for the enemy, of the primal savagery of a sniper duel.

Often trained haphazardly in wartime, and forgotten in times of peace, combat snipers were officially recognized after the Vietnam War, when the Marine Corps became the first military branch to start a full-time sniper school. One Shot-One Kill is their powerful record of desperate trials and proud victories.

A MAIN SELECTION OF THE MILITARY BOOK CLUB

One Shot One Kill










  • 48 responses to "Silent Warrior: The Marine Sniper’s Story Vietnam Continues Military Life & Institutions Charles Henderson Berkley"

  • Judith Allison
    11:10 on May 12th, 2012
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    I have read Silent Warrior as well as Charles Henderson’s first book about Carlos Hathcock II, Marine Sniper, and I enjoyed this book just as much as I enjoyed the first one. Both were well written, and both were inspiring. The life and career of Carlos Hathcock II embody those traits most noble in mankind: courage and devotion to duty, but most of all, concern and love for a fellow human being. Carlos Hathcock II demonstrated that care time and again in risking his own life to help protect his fellow Marines, and especially in risking himself saving men from a burning vehicle. His friend and fellow sniper took this to the ultimate limit in sacrificing his life to save injured men.

    I feel that this book, along with its companion volume, Marine Sniper, could be an inspiration, not only to servicemembers, in ALL branches of the military, but also to the public in general.

  • Ripel
    13:03 on May 12th, 2012
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    From Bologna to Beirut, Sasser gives a unique insight to the special kind of heroism that is essential to be a successful sniper. Each chapter allows the reader to embark on a high-risk mission with a different hero of the science of sniping, that I found totally absorbing. Sasser’s description of the development of Marine Sniper Training and the Marine sniper rifle is a dedication to the legacy left by Land, Hathcock and their brother Marines.

  • TrafficWarden
    13:27 on May 12th, 2012
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    I believe the following quote best speaks to Carlos Hathcock; the Marine; the man.
    ” The only guide to a man is his conscience; the only shield to his memory is the rectitude and sincerity of his actions. It is very imprudent to walk through like without this shield, because we are so often mocked by the failure of our calculation; but with this shield, however the fates may play, we march always in the ranks of honor”.

    I felt compelled to write the above after reading the dual 1-star posts from “a reader” who basically called Mr. Hathcock a liar, fraud and phony.
    He starts out with one line of praise then basically says Mr. Hathcock was a phony and his story a con job.
    Of course he offers no facts or evidence to support his claims.
    Just another who disrespects and spits on those who have served; are serving and will serve.
    He should be ashamed.
    You sir/”a reader”, will never walk among the ranks of honor.

  • John Baxter
    16:22 on May 12th, 2012
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    A “Silent Warrior” is a sequel to the novel “Marine Sniper.” Coming from this non-military reader, I must admit that the novel is excellent. I believe that it does the job in portraying both Carlos Hathcock and John Burke as exemplory Marines.

    The stories that are told about Hathcock are excellent and scary. It goes into detail as to how his sniper squads would go on platoons and how they were trained to be snipers. The novel was very informative and awesome. The writer does a nice job of showing the personal history of Hathcock and describing what he did in Vietnam. The writer also takes an intricate approach by writing what the thought process was of Hathcock’s eventual victim. I thought this was a unique way of building tension in the novel.

    Perhaps the best part of the novel was Henderson’s writings on what happened to John Burke. I think that he has done the Burke family proud due to his account following research as to what happened on the day Burke died. His story would make an combat veteran proud to be in the military.

    Overall the book is great. It was interesting enough to be a page-turner, but it was also informative enough so that it was not boring. The short stories are great, and I would highly recommend this novel for anybody who has been in the military, or anybody who wants to be a sniper. Because Hathcock wrote the rules on being a sniper, so learn from the best.

  • nedendir
    17:48 on May 12th, 2012
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    Breathe, Relax, Aim, Stop, Squeeze. The technique taught to all Marine recruits during marksmanship training and an appropriate metaphor for Charles Henderson’s follow up to Marine Sniper. Thorough with it’s attention to detail as well as enlightening, Henderson includes that material which was cut from his first book about Carlos Hathcock and additional information garnered from North Vietnamese military personnel, including those who had tried in vain to eliminate Hathcock and Jim Land on the battlefield over 30 years ago. I was pleasantly surprised to read about David Sommers who served as Sergeant Major of Second Battalion, Recruit Training Regiment, Marine Corps Recruit Depot, San Diego, California nearly 20 years ago when I made that transformation from slimy civilian to United States Marine and his relationship with Hathcock. The letter to Henderson from Jerry Burke Bouchard, sister of Corporal John R. Burke, will simply bring you to tears.

    All Americans owe a debt of gratitude to Mr. Henderson for bringing Hathcock’s story to print again. Every Marine whether active duty, reserve, former, officer or enlisted should have these books in their library. If you haven’t read either, then read both. If you’ve already read them, then read them again.

  • Satish KC
    22:28 on May 12th, 2012
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    Interesting followup to earlier adventures of Carlos Hathcock, read about a real hero.

  • PaulTheZombie
    23:37 on May 12th, 2012
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    Full of first-hand accounts and stories of military snipers at work with some interesting and informative history inserted in short chapters in between the stories. One section on the development of rifles and early existence of possible sniping concepts in the Revolutionary War era I found to be particularly fascinating. The stories in this book are detailed, and sometimes shocking. Definitely worth reading for those curious and interested about snipers.

  • Ripel
    1:30 on May 13th, 2012
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    I liked this book a lot. A nice little tome on the history of sniping in most of the major wars of this past century. As a former member of a Marine STA Plt. (3/6), I thought the book was a good recount of the development of USMC and USA sniping programs. I particularly liked the accounts of the Korean war and Beiruit, which there aren’t too many books about. There are soo many books on ‘Nam and WWII sniping that it was nice to hear about some of the lesser known conflicts, a history that should be remembered before that knowledge is lost.

  • TrafficWarden
    1:54 on May 13th, 2012
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    I was a military sniper during my active service and I am very glad to come across this book which is nothing but very descriptive accounts of snipers.

    This book throws at you the thoughts of a sniper without any exaggeration, it includes accounts of victory and also failures that snipers encountered, nothing is fabricated. After reading the contents of this book, you will appreciate the mental & emotional stress that snipers have to go through. No every one has the strength to squeeze the trigger. Snipers are really a special breed.

  • John Baxter
    4:49 on May 13th, 2012
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    Fills in lots of the details the Marine Sniper leaves out. Read Marine Sniper first then this and you will have to complete story. There is some repition but not enough to bore you.

  • Karla Shelton
    10:11 on May 13th, 2012
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    I enjoyed this one. The authors have given us a good overview of this history of the sniper in war. If of course would be a mistake to to place this book with some of the other somewhat dry accounts of military history. This is a very readable book, lots of action, lots of insight yet sneeks in some very nice historical facts. It makes history more alive. It is also the story of some very brave and remarkable men. Recommend this for a nice fast read that is very much a page turner.

  • Satish KC
    14:51 on May 13th, 2012
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    This book was written after the death of Carlos Hathcock, in 1999.

    Henderson wrote the original book about Hathcock, Marine Sniper, 93 confirmed kills also.
    This book contains details of his training under Lt Land with the one shot, one kill idea for snipers. Never to take more than one shot from one location, listen, look, be aware of surroundings.
    The book had a good start already as about 300 pages of his original book had been edited, so he included some of them in this one, which is 286 pages.
    He added information gleaned from interviews from the North Vietnamese in
    1994.
    For me, it was one of those “cannot put it down until I finish it” type books.

    He tells the story using assumed final Hatchcock dreams. Thereby the book contains details of his boyhood, basic Marine training, stateside duty, as well as the Vietnam periods.

    Hathcock had 300 probable kills in addition to the 93 confirmed kills.

    The book does into detail about his close relationship with Burke, his partner, who got killed at Khe Sanh after Hathcock left Vietnam on his first tour. A chapter in the book is devoted to Burke, who won the Navy Cross for his valor.

    His close relationship with Ron McAbee is described too.

    They established a sniper school at Hill 55, and soon Hathcock and his commander, Lt Land, had a huge reward out for their deaths. Hathcock was known as White Feather by the enemy as he wore a white feather in his cap.

    The North Vietnamese established a sniper company to take them out. He killed them.
    He was a national champion rifle shot and wanted to go to the Olympics.

    Details about his killing of the Frenchman, a Frenchman , Philip Metz, who had fought for the Viet Minh against the French, and now against the Americans are described. The Frenchman was famous for stripping his prisoner naked, torturing them, and after extracting all information, slitting their throats. The CIA wanted the Frenchman dead as the North Vietnamese had captured a couple of CIA agents, and they did not want the Frenchman to get them to talk.

    His killing of the Apache is also described. She was one of a team of female VC who used BAR’s to kill. She liked to torture her captives by skinning them alive.

    He also took out a North Vietnamese General on a special mission.

    Hathcock got out of the Marines, and tried to become an electrician. He found it too dangerous, and went back in the Marines.

    He went back to Vietnam in `69, and turned down a safe training assignment in the rear. He went back to Hill 55 and restarted the sniper school there. When he got there, the troops did not shave, wear military clothes, or fight. Their job was just clean up work including burning the excrement in the johns. Hatcock soon got them back in training and his platoon got a Presidential Unit Citation for having the most enemy kills.

    He and the Sgt Major did not get along well. Once, a barrel of gas rolled down the hill from where they were training. Hathcock told the Sgt Major, no problem, he could fire a bullet into the barrel, wait awhile, then fire a tracer to start a fire and burn the gas so it did not fall into enemy hands. Instead, the Sgt called in an artillery strike. No hits. Then, he called in an air strike, no hit. The artillery and air strikes did wipe out a lot of the barbed wire protecting the camp though.
    Finally, a sniper started shooting at them. The guard in the tower on a .50 cal gun fired, per Hathcock at the gas and finally ignited it. Then fired and killed the enemy sniper.
    The Sgt Major was happy until he found out that the guard was one of Hathcock’s snipers.

    Once, Hathcock was watching the movie The Green Berets, when the enemy snipers fired at the tent. Everybody ducked but Hathcock, who continued to watch the movie, and even changed the reels as needed to see the finish.

    Hathcock volunteered to help when the 1/7th got in trouble. He was on an APC that got hit in the battle, and stayed on top to rescue 7 people in the APC. He got burned over most of his entire body, and 43% was 3rd degree burns. No award.

    It is believed this is what started the MS that he later got. He never was the marksman he was before, but taught shooting. He would bleed just from wearing the shooting vests. His skin had no elasticity.
    Land, now a major, got Hathcock assigned as his chief shooting instructor.
    In 1979, he was finally declared medically unfit, and retired.

    In 1995 he finally got a Silver Star for saving the Marines on the APC.
    In retirement, he started going deep see shark hunting, and loved it.

  • PaulTheZombie
    16:00 on May 13th, 2012
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    Henderson has succeded in telling a story that needed to be told. A classic style which keeps you reliving the life and times of one of America’s true hero’s. The action is thrilling as well as heart beaking. You cannot come away from this book without a true feeling of the dedication, skill, and courage of the U.S.M.C. sniper.

    Unlike many sequels this is a complement to the original. If you have not read the first book by Mr. Henderson then do yourself a favor and read them both.

  • Ripel
    17:53 on May 13th, 2012
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    Silent Warrior, by Charles Henderson, is a thrilling and suspenseful book. It follows the life of sniper Carlos N. Hathcock II during his two tours in Vietnam. The book tells of some of his experiences in Vietnam, and elaborates on its predecessor Marine Sniper 93 Confirmed Kills.
    Silent Warrior is a very good book, but because it was mostly the things Henderson cut out of his first book, it lacks voice and adventure. If you are planning to read Silent Warrior I would recommend reading Marine Sniper first, because it is the original story of Carlos Hatchcock, not the things the author opted to leave out.

  • TrafficWarden
    18:17 on May 13th, 2012
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    An open letter to Chuck Sasser:

    This is truely an outstanding work of art. As one who has spent hours inside of himself, setting up the shot and waiting for the shot, this book is a unique look at the world from the sniper’s eyes looking out. It made me smell the dampness, feel the insects crawling and biting, remember the cramped muscles from hours of laying in one position, and remember the last thing you ever see of the target – his eyes. A true work of art by a master story teller.

  • John Baxter
    21:12 on May 13th, 2012
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    Good book for introduction to history of sniping and its development in US Wars and Conflicts. Traces history of sniping and provided personal stories of famous US snipers in history of our Wars. Easy read. Not as compelling as the Carlos Hathcock story “Marine Sniper” but does contain several of his famous shoots in the first person.

  • nedendir
    22:38 on May 13th, 2012
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    One Shot – One Kill talks about the history and development of the sniper division. Not that long ago, snipers were looked down upon before as being cowards because they hid. Yet over time people began to realize how desperately snipers were needed. So instead of like before just taking men who scored well on marksmanship men are now being trained in the art of sniping. The book tells the stories of some of the things that happened to veteran snipers. It gives you in depths look at the mind and happenings of a sniper.
    I believe this was an all around good book, and highly recommend it to fellow readers of historical and military books. I recommend this book because when the men are telling there stories I almost feel as if I am there and am living it myself. It is well written and an easy read.

  • Satish KC
    3:19 on May 14th, 2012
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    I have mixed feelings about this book because of the structure of the content. Some chapters consist of a general discussion about snipers & sniping, while the other chapters are first-person narratives based on interviews of various snipers. The latter were quite interesting and made for good reading, the former, however, were not so good because of the haphazard manner in which the information was organized, unnecessary repetition, and, as is mentioned in other reviews, the inclusion of questionable facts such as the Zaystev/Koenig duel.

  • PaulTheZombie
    4:27 on May 14th, 2012
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    Even though it goes great as a sequel to Marine Sniper: 93 Confirmed Kills, it holds its own by itself. Great reading, will keep you at it until you’re done.

  • Ripel
    6:20 on May 14th, 2012
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    This book traces the evolution of the sniper in warfare through short stories from various wars. For such a short book it has some interesting moments. A good read.

  • Markoc
    8:48 on May 14th, 2012
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    A very good book, continuing the tales and adventures of Carlos N. Hathcock II in Vietnam. The book covers his second tour in Vietnam and provides a good closing to the story of his life after the Marines.

    Gives a good look into the problems he suffered in his later years both with his health and mental state, and how he was able to overcome anything that life threw his way. A great man of ethics and principal who serves as a positive role model for young men.

  • John Baxter
    11:42 on May 14th, 2012
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    Great book, liked the fact that it was about snipers in WWII, Korea, Nam, Beirut…gives an informative view from different wars….best stories were about Carlos N. Hatchcock.

  • nedendir
    13:08 on May 14th, 2012
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    I have just finished reading this book and have mixed reviews on it. On the positive side, the descriptions of the hunts and kills were very graphic and believable. The book profiles a variety of snipers and their stories. On the negative side, there is too much “history” of setting up sniper schools, etc. Also, what I found very disturbing was the many racist references to the enemy, especially the Asians. Terms like “slant eyes,” “hamburgers,” “gooks,” and “yellow skinned…” were unneccessary, even if they were direct quotes. I’m not sure how the authors could have handled this, but each time I read a dehumanizing racist comment, I was reminded why so many loyal Americans took to the streets in the 60′s and 70′s to protest the Vietnam War. It was called a racist war then, and I believe to this day, it was still a racist war. One Shot, One Kill is worthy of 3 stars at best.

  • Satish KC
    17:49 on May 14th, 2012
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    And well done, Charles Henderson! They say that one’s first book is always going to be a preparation for the second, and the book, Marine Sniper, that I read about Carlos Hathcock, just warmed me up for this second go-round of Hathcock adventures. In a way the two books were very similar, since it says in the introduction that they were carved out of the same UR-manuscript and written before Carlos’ death five years ago.

    SILENT WARRIOR gives a deeper perspective on some of the events and personalities depicted in MS93CK. The drawback for me is that I think to give the book more weight, Henderson resorts to some dubious devices to pump up the volume, including imagining what Carlos was thinking at such and such a time, and also frankly the worst offenders of the story, APACHE and PHILIP METZ, are turned into super-villainous caricatures that Ian Fleming might have dreamed up to torture James Bond. If they really existed, and Carlos killed them, good for him. But the writing is so over the top it’s hard to be sure.

    This would be a good introduction to the life and death of a great Marine, but we already had the other book which is also a good introduction, so it’s a draw.

  • PaulTheZombie
    18:58 on May 14th, 2012
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    Utilizing materials omitted from his original book on Carlos Hathcock, “Marine Sniper”, Charles Henderson fills in some very interesting gaps in this earlier book. Additional information was also obtained from interviews conducted in Vietnam in 1994, particularly with general Gen. Tran Van Tra, Commander in Chief of the Viet Cong. “Silent Warrior” may start a bit slow, perhaps owing to the maudlin and unnecessary fiction of Hathcock reviewing his life upon his death bed, but the action and the suspense picks up fast. Particularly chilling was the account of the sadistic torture methods employed by the notorious Frenchman, Philip Metz, and the Apache. The elimination of both by Hathcock were clear examples of the necessity of taking life to prevent further killing. The telling of his taking out of the Frenchman shortly before he could utilize his particular skills again was very well written.

    Hathcock’s sniping was so effective and had so demoralized the enemy that they placed a bounty oh his head equal to three years pay. Additionally, under Colonel Ba, a ten-man team of snipers was brought into the area with the exclusive purpose of killing Hathcock and his Captain, Jim Land. The elimination of the leader and best sniper of this team in a tense cat and mouse game of stalking and tracking was extremely well done, both in the act and in the retelling. The shot that brings his counter part to his demise would be unbelievable were it not so well documented.

    “Marine Sniper” and “Silent Warrior” are well written books about the life of Carlos Hathcock, the finest sniper to take to the field. His life and exploits are the stuff of heroes, of men larger than mortals. Among Marines he is one of the best known and most beloved of their members. Fitting of Hathcock although written for another are the words, “The elements so mixed in him that all of nature would stand and say, this was a man”.

  • Ripel
    20:51 on May 14th, 2012
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    I picked this one up ,and enjoyed it through the whole thing. I enjoy short stories. And thats what this book has. The only annoying thing was that in between some of the stories, a chapter would be put in explaining snipers and random stuff. It kinda threw off the flow of actually reading a persons one story. But do what I did ,and skip those chapters. I’m pretty sure there was interesting stuff in those chapters ,but I read one and a half of them ,and was bored. On to the stories. Well worth checking out

  • TrafficWarden
    21:15 on May 14th, 2012
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    This is a very well-written mini-history of the development and art of the sniper throughout modern warfare. Easily readable, it is broken up into chapters and individual stories. It makes for an enjoyable and informative journey through the most feared, hated, and misunderstood soldier on the battlefield. The compartmentalized format makes it easy to set down and pick back up on later, but chances are you’ll read it straight through because of it’s quality and interest value. Snippets of larger stories appear, like Carlos Hathcock’s epic story, so it gives the reader a little knowledge on each great sniper. Highly recommended.

  • John Baxter
    0:10 on May 15th, 2012
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    I really didnt expect much but it turned into a page turner(I was trying to get a copy of Marine Sniper from our lame library). I thought I knew everything about the Vietnam experience but this book had some surprises for me. By the time Carlos Hathcock was hanging his hat in Vietnam he had won so many marksmanship medals he was already a dangerous weapon. But he disciplined himself to become even more stealthy plus improved his deadly accuracy by adjusting for range and windage, taking it to the next level. By “getting into his bubble.” By doing everything he needed to survive long enough to take out the other guy, including painting and decorating every square inch of his body. This book takes you to the snakes, mosquitoes, and rice paddies of Vietnam. And once there, to hunt the ultimate game. And…. Corporal Burke…the guy should’ve received the Medal of Honor for his valor. That guy’s courage gave me goosebumps!! The Marines should give a copy of this to new recruits to read and required reading for snipers.

    One slight is they put a picture of the author on the back jacket of the book, but no picture at all of the our American hero, Carlos Hathcock!!! If there is one picture you should include, and easily could include, it would be one of Hathcock. In fact, a series of pics, even in black & white, of some of the Marines mentioned and the associated camps in Vietnam would’ve been a big plus. FYI: Marine Sniper does have a slew of B&W photos, exactly the stuff Hathcock fans long to see. This book’s writing is only average at best, but as Stephen King maintains, it’s the story first and foremost. And this story is awesome.

  • Karla Shelton
    5:32 on May 15th, 2012
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    Time after time, people find that one of the most valuable soldiers on the battle field is the sniper. Their simple motto of “One shot: one kill” is all they need to live by. The enemy’s life is cheap. It only takes one bullet to kill him.
    I am not much of a book-reader, but this was quite possibly the most fascinating book I have ever laid eyes on. Chronicling the achievements of such men like Carlos Hathcock and John Fulcher put war in perspective for me. You never hear the one with your name on it. This lifestyle is hell, not glory. It’s not one of those John Wayne movies where the good guy always wins. It’s horrible and life-scarring, as illustrated in this book. I would gladly read it another ten times.

  • Satish KC
    10:12 on May 15th, 2012
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    Even though it is a sequel, of sorts, this book could easily stand alone as one of the finer military history pieces recounting the Vietnam era. Henderson retells the story of Marine Sniper from different perspectives, even those of the Viet Cong and peasants. Many issues are dealt with, including the homecoming of the warrior and the difficulties that situation can bring, military “careerism” that has turned away some of the best Marines, and the psychological effects of the individual combatants.
    Henderson goes more in depth into the later years of Carlos Hathcock, which hadn’t occurred yet in the first book. Also included is more analysis into the sniper program and its role in modern warfare and how snipers deal with daily stigmas and resentment from other units.
    An excellent read, it could easily be mistaken for fiction. A must read for all military professionals and especially infantrymen.

  • PaulTheZombie
    11:21 on May 15th, 2012
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    This is the best book I have ever read. It is a wonderful companion to the first book 93 comfirmed kills. It answers a lot of things the first book did not explain. I would highly recomend both books to anyone. BEST I HAVE EVER READ!!!!!

  • Ripel
    13:14 on May 15th, 2012
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    One shot one kill is a terrific book for those who enjoy reading the experiences of snipers from all parts of history.It gives amazing accounts from World War II and the Vietnam War among others.It’s an especially good book because the authors have a huge base of knowledge on the subject and have an effective way of explaining the circumstances in which the snipers in this book preformed their duties.Again a terrific book that will make one appreciate the art of sniping.

  • TrafficWarden
    13:38 on May 15th, 2012
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    The material used for “Silent Warrior” were the pages that were cut from “Marine Sniper” to manage the size of that first book. So this book is based on much of the same interviews and recollections.

    I found “Silent Warrior” to be as good or better than “Marine Sniper”.
    The first book may have had more details about some of the shootings, but this book has more details about the sniper’s mission-oriented targets and what made them valuable as targets.

    The noble reason for writing the first book is elaborated on.

    In “Silent Warrior” the reader gets to see the heroism of Carlos Hathcock when he saved other Marines at his own expense,suffering terrible burns that eventually contributed to ending his career. The character of his sniper-partner John Burke and his heroism in the field was detailed.

    This book has emotion in the pages. In part because it was written after Carlos Hathcock had passed away. Mr Henderson takes the reader along on fishing trips and ceremonies that were part of Hatchcock’s life towards the end.
    Both “Marine Sniper” and “Silent Warrior” are excellent books and recommended for anyone that wants to read about the most fearsome sniper ever to serve the U.S.A.

  • John Baxter
    16:33 on May 15th, 2012
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    I felt this was a real good book that shows the history of the sniper and the evolution of this group. A lot of good stories about different snipers and the “jobs” they did. Though the book was interesting it did seem a little repetitive towards the end of. If you have read any other books about snipers then you will find some of the same stories in this book.

  • nedendir
    17:59 on May 15th, 2012
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    I purchased this book as I have always been interested in the stories behind war. I am not very interested in the war itself, but rather the stories of the people who fight the wars.

    This book is a biography of Carlos Hathcock. Being born after the Vietnam War, the name typically would have meant nothing to me except I ran into the son of one of Hathcock’s “trainees” and Hathcock’s name always stuck with me.

    Hathcock was just another Marine in Vietnam. He was an elite marksman with a rifle, yet this was ignored and upon arriving in Vietnam, Hathcock was assigned to a desk job in an MP battalion as a watch commander. After serving as an MP for a while, a “freak” occurrence required Hathcock to use his marksmanship skills to take out an enemy shooter who had attacked the base. The enemy solider was to be taken out at his village. From there, Hathcock’s career rapidly progresses into becoming a sniper. The book covers Hathcock’s legendary career as a sniper. During two tours of duty, Hathcock racked up almost 100 confirmed kills and numerous other unconfirmed kills. Hathcock became so good at what he did, the enemy offered a $20,000 bounty to the person who killed Hathcock or his partner. The enemy formulated several special groups and executed some brilliant strategies to try and take out the “white feather”.

    My meager words could never do justice to the author. Reading the book is like watching a poetic war drama. The eloquence the author uses in this book is mesmerizing. The scenes are described in such vivid detail, I felt like I was there, hearing bullets buzz above my head, listening to my heart pounding, watching the blood of an unfortunate soldier soak into the earth, as I see the person next to me squeeze the trigger to silence the enemy soldier’s rifle. The stories in the book range from humorous, victorious, heroic, then to disheartening. To the people who are unfamiliar with Hathcock’s story, the end of Hathcock’s days in Vietnam is shocking, but not surprising. I was most impressed by the humanity Hathcock expressed. He never looked at it as killing an enemy solder, rather he saw his job as saving the lives of American soldiers. I also found some of the stories in the book familiar, as I recognized bits and pieces I’ve seen in movies over the years (probably the most well-known being the “scope” episode, which is in the movie “Saving Private Ryan”. I’m guessing this is based on Hathcock’s story).

    This is by far one of the best books I have read that cover the life of a soldier. I would highly recommend this book to people interested in the life of a sniper or are interested in soldiers of the Vietnam War.

  • Satish KC
    22:39 on May 15th, 2012
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    This is a follow up to Marine Sniper by the same author and is about the subject. If you have read Marine Sniper this book is a good apendix in that it goes more into depth into some of the accounts in Marine Sniper. It also address Carlos Hathcock’s life after he left Vietnam including some real tear jerking ceremonies in his honor. If both the books had been combined it would have been great but I guess most people don’t like books that long. If you are looking for a pure sniping book this is not for you. If you are looking to learn more about Carlos than you read in Marine Sniper this is a great book.

  • PaulTheZombie
    23:48 on May 15th, 2012
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    This is not a bad book, but it is certainly not a great book. It would benefit much from a few simple additions: table of contents, maps, pictures, timelines, specs. of weapons and equipment, and an index. All of these devices are missing but would have gone a long way toward making this book more academic and useful.

    More disturbing is the credence lent to the highly suspect duel between Konings and Zaitsev during the Battle for Stalingrad, 1942-43. Many, if not most, historians doubt this duel ever took place and was simply a successful product of Soviet propaganda (vividly recreated in the film, Enemy at the Gates>. The authors of this book take this duel to be gospel truth and make no mention of its dubious origins.
    The personal reflections of snipers give this book powerful elements. It also gains strength by drawing on the experiences of snipers across wars. The stories of Marine Sergeant Carlos Hathcock are riveting. The authors definitely display a bias toward the Marine Corps to the detriment of U.S. Army snipers.

    This is an easy read and not a bad overview of sniping. If you want a more rigorous and academic book, Sniper : the Skills, the Weapons, and the Experiences by Adrian Gilbert is a better choice.

  • Ripel
    1:41 on May 16th, 2012
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    It was a pleasure to read this book, with a well balanced mixture of factual information and hilarious stories from the troops themselves. The information here is as relevant today as it was during the vietnam war…

  • TrafficWarden
    2:05 on May 16th, 2012
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    The art of sniping from the American Revolution to Korea then to Vietnam. The best of the best are portrayed in this easy to read novel. For all of those who have read Marine Sniper this is a must read. Snipers from Carlos Hathcock to Jim Land tell their story in this fast paced book. It is very informative and explains each situation and the art of sniping. It gets my seal of approval, and is a must read.

  • John Baxter
    5:00 on May 16th, 2012
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    This is a book that was published after Calos’ passing. It is well written, a loving rememberance of a friend near to the author. If you are touched by deep patriotism or just rugged independence and dedication to one’s peers there is no finer story that brings these qualities to light than that of Calos Hathcock II.

  • nedendir
    6:26 on May 16th, 2012
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    This was an interesting book that was written from the perspective of one who has actually done what they have written about. The author does an excellent job of describing his experiences as a top sniper for the USMC. The only fault I noticed was that it was too “pro-military”. (I have read MANY books on the Vietnam conflict and have the perspective with which to judge this.)

  • Satish KC
    11:07 on May 16th, 2012
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    This is a tough one. I read the book and found it a remarkable read. It came across to me, an amateur, as authentic and seemed to ring true in regard to the detailed pains the sniper must take to get his kill while simultaneously avoiding becoming road kill himself. I have no idea whether the naysayers are sour grapes or really know that some of this is inaccurate research. One would think that if this is hogwash there would be more experienced military as well as military snipers who would write disparaging reviews on Amazon. So until I know for certain that the authors took liberties, I will only say that I enjoyed the book and it kept my interest throughout.

  • PaulTheZombie
    12:15 on May 16th, 2012
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    I recently read “Silent Warrior” and thought it was a really good book.I’m a military buff and have read many military books both fiction and non-fiction.I read “Marine Sniper” with a vengenance because I couldn’t put it down.I became completely enamored with Carlos Hathcock and I’d never heard of him before then.Then I saw “Silent Warrior” was out and I salivated to have it.I read it in 2 days.I don’t think it was as good as the first book but it was excellent none the less.It tells more of Carlos and Burkes missions through Carlos’ “minds-eye” as he lay suffering in his final days with MS.It picks up where “Marine Sniper” left off and fills in some holes.It tells just how close the NVA and VC came to collecting the bounty on Carlos and Lands head.It doesn’t rehash the same stories, but adds some insite to them with retelling them.I would highly recommend this book to anyone who is a fan and supporter of Carlos, the art of sniping, and the military.I gave it 3 stars because it’s not as good as “Marine Sniper”(4 stars) and only one book has ever gotten 5 stars from me.

  • Ripel
    14:08 on May 16th, 2012
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    I read the really bad putdown that the reader from Oceanside hands Silent Warrior and its author. I have read both Marine Sniper and Silent Warrior and found their depictions very accurate. I was in Vietnam as a Marine and drank 333 Beer. I even had a T-shirt with the yellow, red and black 333 label on it. Corporal Burke was awarded the Navy Cross for his heroism at Khe Sanh. I have personally read the documentation, and know the Gunny who put Burke in for the Navy Cross (second to the Medal of Honor). Burke was not acting as a sniper at Khe Sanh, but as a rifle squad leader, and had several men on the hill under his leadership when overrun. He saved their lives, and died doing it. It is documented fact, easily obtainable through Marine Corps headquarters. Henderson draws Burke’s death directly from what is written in the documentation used to award the Navy Cross to Burke. Did they get it wrong too? The reader’s accusation that Burke’s heroism and character are false is shameful. With time memories do fade, and Viet Vets like myself and Henderson may remember things differently. Little things like German Tape, so what!

  • TrafficWarden
    14:33 on May 16th, 2012
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    I finished reading this book with very mixed feelings. The author deserves infinite praise for “Marine Sniper”, bringing Carlos Hathcock’s story to a far broader audience than previously knew about him. To the extent that this second book helps get the story out to a newer generation of readers, that’s terrific too. However, as a book on its own merits, it wasn’t all that great. Other reviewers have criticized the device of presuming to know Carlos’ thoughts in his final days. It made me a bit uncomfortable as well. All told, I came away with the sense that Henderson tried to stretch a 2nd book out of too little new material. If I was advising a friend on a first read about Carlos Hathcock, I’d recommend the first book instead of this one. But, just to flip flop one last time, bringing ANY additional material about such an amazing man to the public deserves credit. I said I had mixed feelings…

  • Jim Levitt
    20:18 on May 16th, 2012
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    Regarding the review written by Glen Senkowski, I would like to ask which author he is talking about? Sasser or Roberts? Roberts did not write the book he is describing about chopper pilots. Indeed, Roberts IS a chopper pilot, and a former Vietnam Vet Marine who served in the infantry and as a sniper in I Corps in 1966. It is true that Sasser has a tendency to add too much color to his writing and sometimes embelishes the facts, but in all One Shot–One Kill is a compilation of stories gleaned from personal interviews conducted by Roberts with the various men who tell of their experiences in this book. All interviews were taped, documented and checked for authenticity. Roberts later was an advisor to the History Channel’s “Suicide Mission” series “Snipers” and “Combat Medics.”

    I know Craig and can verify he is a meticulous researcher and investigative journalist. See his other books, “The Medusa File,” and “Kill Zone.”

  • nedendir
    21:44 on May 16th, 2012
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    This is a sequel/follow-up to the original book “Marine Sniper – 93 Confirmed Kills” about Carlos Hathcock, a super-shot, authentic Vietnam hero, great patriot and one of our finest Marines. The sequel carries much of the interviewing and research by the author that didn’t make it into the original epistle. The book also takes the reader into ‘life after Vietnam’ for Carlos, a lot about his family, and of course, his eventual death at age 56 because of multiple sclerosis. Carlos ended up with 93 confirmed kills in Vietnam as a scout sniper and 300 probable kills. He valued life and mostly for the protection of his fellow Marines – he felt that every enemy combatant he eliminated could no longer harm his ‘grunts.’ He completed some of the most difficult missions every assigned to a Marine – there is also information about his trainees and partners, and the many medals he won as a sharpshooter in competitions. As an additional and interesting segment, Henderson twice interviewed Viet Cong General Tran Van Tra, Commander in Chief during the war, who authorized the formation of a special sniper unit with the sole purpose of finding and killing Hathcock, and eventually resorted to placing a $20,000 bounty on the ‘white feather’ sniper. Fortunately, the bounty was never collected.

  • Satish KC
    2:25 on May 17th, 2012
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    Both awesome and tragic. As close as you can come to crawling on your stomach for hours in the hot sun, tasting the grass, feeling the bites of ants while experiencing the thrill of hunting the enemy. You’ll never regret reading this book.

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