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Racism in Europe: 1870-2000 Palgrave Macmillan Neil MacMaster


30th April 2011 History Books 3 Comments

The study of modern racism has tended to treat anti-Semitism and anti-black racism as separate and unconnected phenomena. This innovative study argues that a full understanding of the origins and development of racism in Europe after 1870 needs to examine the structure and interrelationships between the two dominant forms of prejudice. The “crisis of modernity” found expression in a deepening political racism which was formulated, according to national contexts, through negative stereotypes of the black and the Jew which were structured in quite different ways. By weaving together the changing spatial and temporal dimensions of anti-Semitic and anti-black prejudice Neil MacMaster provides a fresh and more global framework for understanding modern racism.

‘Racism in Europe is a precious and easy to read book for students and scholars interested in what remains, alas more than ever, a topical subject.’ – Nonna Mayer, West European Politics ‘…a readable book that covers many of the highlights of writings on race as well as major issues…’ – Elazar Barkan, American Historical Review

Neil MacMaster is Senior Lecturer in European Politics at the University of East Anglia.

‘Racism in Europe is a precious and easy to read book for students and scholars interested in what remains, alas more than ever, a topical subject.’ – Nonna Mayer, West European Politics ‘…a readable book that covers many of the highlights of writings on race as well as major issues…’ – Elazar Barkan, American Historical Review

Racism in Europe: 1870-2000 (European Culture & Society S.)










  • 3 responses to "Racism in Europe: 1870-2000 Palgrave Macmillan Neil MacMaster"

  • Jim Renfro
    15:06 on April 30th, 2011
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    I read this book after I read “Lila Says” by Chimo. These books are both similar in setting. It was a depressing but accurate description of life in the arab populated Paris ghettos. The value of life, the dead end feeling, and the chaos and feeling of hopelessness was depicted like I have never read before. The characters seemed real and the surroundings were easy to picture, very vivid. And you felt for everyone in the book especially the families who came to France for a better life and received something far worse- destruction of their culture, detrioration of their children, rascism, and the feeling of leaving a whole familiar world behind and being trapped in a concrete world. more than enyting it also has french characters too that are within the same situation. It is very much telling of the immigrant experience anywhere for arabs- they leave an opressive regime where they are poor and want better and think they are going to have an incredible life some where else, so they leave their country, their language, and their family behind in search. what they find is a world in repulsion with theirs where they are very different and it is hard to survive and with this everything they know is gone and their children are different from they are and feel even more disconnected from their surroundings and their parents world. Well written.

  • WotRoo
    18:41 on May 2nd, 2011
    Reply to comment

    Charef sucks you into the slums of Paris long enough to understand how life there truly is. I recommend this book to everyone; especially to middle and upper class individuals looking for an accurate perspective on lower class life.

  • Rick Monson
    12:56 on May 3rd, 2011
    Reply to comment

    Tea in the Harem is an excellent account of life in the slums of Paris. It is at times disturbingly real and deals with Foreigners trying to make a go of it in the mean streets of France. I liked it because it reveals another side of Paris; a bleak, dirty, and dangerous side not often dealt with in books and movies. Anyone who has an interest in racial conflict and poverty will find this book enlightening. If you like tea, and you like harems, then you’ll love Tea in the Harem.

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