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Pegasus Bridge: June 6 1944 Europe France Stephen E. Ambrose Simon & Schuster


31st October 2011 History Books 0 Comments

Los Angeles Herald Examiner All the vividness of a movie, and all the intelligence — in every sense — of fine military history.

Drew Middleton The New York Times Book Review An illuminating account of an operation as strategically important as any fought on D-Day.

James Pitts New Orleans Times A little gem. One that will be drawn from by historians of the future.

Noland Norgaard The Denver Post The best war story this reviewer has ever read.

6 1-hour cassettes –This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

In the early morning hours of June 6, 1944, a small detachment of British airborne troops stormed the German defense forces and paved the way for the Allied invasion of Europe. Pegasus Bridge was the first engagement of D-Day, the turning point of World War II. This gripping account of it by acclaimed author Stephen Ambrose brings to life a daring mission so crucial that, had it been unsuccessful, the entire Normandy invasion might have failed. Ambrose traces each step of the preparations over many months to the minute-by-minute excitement of the hand-to-hand confrontations on the bridge. This is a story of heroism and cowardice, kindness and brutality — the stuff of all great adventures.

Los Angeles Herald Examiner All the vividness of a movie, and all the intelligence — in every sense — of fine military history.

Drew Middleton The New York Times Book Review An illuminating account of an operation as strategically important as any fought on D-Day.

James Pitts New Orleans Times A little gem. One that will be drawn from by historians of the future.

Noland Norgaard The Denver Post The best war story this reviewer has ever read.

Pegasus Bridge: June 6, 1944

The Wild Blue : The Men and Boys Who Flew the B-24s Over Germany 1944-45

Long before he entered politics, when he was just in his early 20s, South Dakotan George McGovern flew 35 bomber missions over Nazi-occupied Europe, earning a Distinguished Flying Cross for bravery under fire. Stephen Ambrose, the industrious historian, focuses on McGovern and the young crew of his B-24 bomber, volunteers all, in this vivid study of the air war in Europe.

Manufactured by a consortium of companies that included Ford Motor and Douglas Aircraft, the B-24 bomber, dubbed the Liberator, was designed to drop high explosives on enemy positions well behind the front lines–and especially on the German capital, Berlin. Unheated, drafty, and only lightly armored, the planes were dangerous places to be, and indeed, only 50 percent of their crews survived to the war’s end. Dangerous or not, they did their job, delivering thousand- pound bombs to targets deep within Germany and Austria.

In his fast-paced narrative, Ambrose follows many other flyers (including the Tuskegee Airmen, the African American pilots who gave the B-24s essential fighter support on some of their most dangerous missions) as they brave the long odds against them, facing moments of glory and terror alike. “It would be an exaggeration to say that the B-24 won the war for the Allies,” Ambrose writes. “But don’t ask how they could have won the war without it.” –Gregory McNamee –This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Stephen Ambrose is the acknowledged dean of the historians of World War II in Europe. In three highly acclaimed, bestselling volumes, he has told the story of the bravery, steadfastness, and ingenuity of the ordinary young men, the citizen soldiers, who fought the enemy to a standstill — the band of brothers who endured together.

The very young men who flew the B-24s over Germany in World War II against terrible odds were yet another exceptional band of brothers, and, in The Wild Blue, Ambrose recounts their extraordinary brand of heroism, skill, daring, and comradeship with the same vivid detail and affection. With his remarkable gift for bringing alive the action and tension of combat, Ambrose carries us along in the crowded, uncomfortable, and dangerous B-24s as their crews fought to the death through thick black smoke and deadly flak to reach their targets and destroy the German war machine.

The Wild Blue : The Men and Boys Who Flew the B-24s Over Germany 1944-45










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