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Peace Came in the Form of a Woman: Indians and Spaniards in the Texas Borderlands Juliana Barr The University of North Carolina Press


30th June 2012 History Books 0 Comments

“An important analysis of Spanish-Indian relations in a borderlands region where Indian power stayed remarkably strong. Through her recovery of the stories of women, Barr shows that, at least until the nineteenth century, gender remained a stronger influence than race on those always volatile relationships.”
–Church History

“A field-changing work. . . . The first to show how really essential gender is to contact studies.”
William and Mary Quarterly

“Rich, complex, and detailed. . . . A well-crafted and thoughtful work that does much to alter the landscape of American history.”
Signs

“Contributes to a fundamental debate in North American history. . . . Well-written and insightful interpretation.”
— Arkansas Historical Review

“Juliana Barr . . . brings us a brilliant re-analysis of the interactions of the Native Americans and Spaniards across the frontier . . . . With remarkable insight and cultural perspicuity, Barr filters the early Texas history story through a new historical lens. . . . From the book’s opening Introduction, the reader is stunned with the inversion of historical understanding.”
— East Texas Historical Journal

“A fine book in every respect, clearly written, persuasive, solidly documented, and useful for both student and scholar alike. . . . Encourages scholars to look anew at areas where Indians met Europeans.”
Hispanic American Historical Review

“Deserves to be reckoned with by future scholarship on colonial Texas. . . . fundamental contributions to the historiography on colonial Texas.”
Catholic Southwest

“A superbly crafted contribution to the growing literature that places Native Americans at the center of the struggle for control of eighteenth-century North America. . . . This finely conceptualized and beautifully executed book easily ranks on the short list of essential reading for scholars of Native American history.”
— Journal of Interdisciplinary History

“Transforming enemies into allies took decades, and Barr offers a way to begin revising and rethinking the literature on these . . . encounters.”
— The Journal of American History

“Barr skillfully blends anthropology and Spanish sources to present a complicated picture that revises the standard narrative of Spanish colonial Texas. . . . A nuanced picture of the shifting ground upon which Spanish-Indian relations were built, and the importance of tapping into indigenous understandings of diplomacy in order to more completely comprehend these cultural encounters.”
— New Mexico Historical Review

“Historiographically significant and beautifully written,Peace Came in the Form of a Woman will enjoy a wide readership among those interested in early American, Native American, and Borderlands history.”
— Journal of American Ethnic History

“[Barr's] conclusions are compelling . . . . Everyone who studies the Spanish borderlands, Native Americans, or women needs to read this book.”
— CHOICE

Peace Came in the Form of a Woman vastly deepens our knowledge of the colonial Texas borderlands and thus our understanding of early North American history.
–James F. Brooks, author of Captives and Cousins: Slavery, Kinship and Community in the Southwest Borderlands

With a richly crafted narrative and lively prose, it is an amazing achievement.
–Kathleen M. Brown, University of Pennsylvania

Revising the standard narrative of European-Indian relations in America, Juliana Barr reconstructs a world in which Indians were the dominant power and Europeans were the ones forced to accommodate, resist, and persevere. She demonstrates that between the 1690s and 1780s, Indian peoples including Caddos, Apaches, Payayas, Karankawas, Wichitas, and Comanches formed relationships with Spaniards in Texas that refuted European claims of imperial control. Instead of being defined in racial terms, as was often the case with European constructions of power, diplomatic relations between the Indians and Spaniards in the region were dictated by Indian expressions of power, grounded in gendered terms of kinship.

Revising the standard narrative of European-Indian relations in America, Juliana Barr reconstructs a world in which Indians were the dominant power and Europeans were the ones forced to accommodate, resist, and persevere.

“An important analysis of Spanish-Indian relations in a borderlands region where Indian power stayed remarkably strong. Through her recovery of the stories of women, Barr shows that, at least until the nineteenth century, gender remained a stronger influence than race on those always volatile relationships.”
–Church History

“A field-changing work. . . . The first to show how really essential gender is to contact studies.”
William and Mary Quarterly

“Rich, complex, and detailed. . . . A well-crafted and thoughtful work that does much to alter the landscape of American history.”
Signs

“Contributes to a fundamental debate in North American history. . . . Well-written and insightful interpretation.”
— Arkansas Historical Review

“Juliana Barr . . . brings us a brilliant re-analysis of the interactions of the Native Americans and Spaniards across the frontier . . . . With remarkable insight and cultural perspicuity, Barr filters the early Texas history story through a new historical lens. . . . From the book’s opening Introduction, the reader is stunned with the inversion of historical understanding.”
— East Texas Historical Journal

“A fine book in every respect, clearly written, persuasive, solidly documented, and useful for both student and scholar alike. . . . Encourages scholars to look anew at areas where Indians met Europeans.”
Hispanic American Historical Review

“Deserves to be reckoned with by future scholarship on colonial Texas. . . . fundamental contributions to the historiography on colonial Texas.”
Catholic Southwest

“A superbly crafted contribution to the growing literature that places Native Americans at the center of the struggle for control of eighteenth-century North America. . . . This finely conceptualized and beautifully executed book easily ranks on the short list of essential reading for scholars of Native American history.”
— Journal of Interdisciplinary History

“Transforming enemies into allies took decades, and Barr offers a way to begin revising and rethinking the literature on these . . . encounters.”
— The Journal of American History

“Barr skillfully blends anthropology and Spanish sources to present a complicated picture that revises the standard narrative of Spanish colonial Texas. . . . A nuanced picture of the shifting ground upon which Spanish-Indian relations were built, and the importance of tapping into indigenous understandings of diplomacy in order to more completely comprehend these cultural encounters.”
— New Mexico Historical Review

“Historiographically significant and beautifully written,Peace Came in the Form of a Woman will enjoy a wide readership among those interested in early American, Native American, and Borderlands history.”
— Journal of American Ethnic History

“[Barr's] conclusions are compelling . . . . Everyone who studies the Spanish borderlands, Native Americans, or women needs to read this book.”
— CHOICE

Peace Came in the Form of a Woman vastly deepens our knowledge of the colonial Texas borderlands and thus our understanding of early North American history.
–James F. Brooks, author of Captives and Cousins: Slavery, Kinship and Community in the Southwest Borderlands

With a richly crafted narrative and lively prose, it is an amazing achievement.
–Kathleen M. Brown, University of Pennsylvania

Peace Came in the Form of a Woman: Indians and Spaniards in the Texas Borderlands

War of a Thousand Deserts: Indian Raids and the U.S.-Mexican War

“Brian DeLay is one of the most articulate and original authors writing in the Western Americana field today.” Howard R. Lamar, author of The New Encyclopedia of the American West”

In the early 1830s, after decades of relative peace, northern Mexicans and the Indians whom they called the barbarians descended into a terrifying cycle of violence. For the next fifteen years, owing in part to changes unleashed by American expansion, Indian warriors launched devastating attacks across ten Mexican states. Raids and counter-raids claimed thousands of lives, ruined much of northern Mexicos economy, depopulated its countryside, and left man-made deserts in place of thriving settlements. Just as important, this vast interethnic war informed and emboldened U.S. arguments in favor of seizing Mexican territory while leaving northern Mexicans too divided, exhausted, and distracted to resist the American invasion and subsequent occupation.

Exploring Mexican, American, and Indian sources ranging from diplomatic correspondence and congressional debates to captivity narratives and plains Indians pictorial calendars, War of a Thousand Deserts recovers the surprising and previously unrecognized ways in which economic, cultural, and political developments within native communities affected nineteenth-century nation-states. In the process this ambitious book offers a rich and often harrowing new narrative of the era when the United States seized half of Mexicos national territory.


War of a Thousand Deserts: Indian Raids and the U.S.-Mexican War (The Lamar Series in Western History)










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