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One-Eyed Dream Bantam Terry C. Johnston


29th April 2013 Literature & Fiction 16 Comments

One-Eyed Dream is the final volume in Terry C. Johnston’s exciting trilogy of the rugged trappers and mountain men, Indian fighters, and hardy pioneers who battled for the future of this land–and won.

High in the Rockies lay the Bayou Salade, a lush beaver-rich valley so untouched that the few white men who had seen it called it paradise.But for Scratch Bass, his young partner Josiah Paddock, and the two Indian women they loved, this paradise would open up a hell of violence.Pursued by a vengeful Arapaho raiding party, Scratch will lead his small band through a flurry of arrows all the way to Taos itself. Yet the trail of blood will not end there.For in St. Louis an old enemy waits, and the time is ripe for Scratch to settle a ten-year score.Through the desert known as the Journey of Death to the rough-and-tumble town of St. Louis, Scratch and Josiah will defy the wilderness to bury the past–and a blackhearted killer–once and for all.

Although identified as the third book in a trilogy (after Carry the Wind and Borderloris), the final line in this volume reads: “This ain’t the last you’ve heard of Titus Bass!” Bass is the hard-bitten, one-eyed “old” (40) trapper and mountain man who’s befriended orphan Josiah Paddock. In 1833 they and their Indian wives, and Josiah’s infant son, make their way to an idyllic spot in northern New Mexico, later moving on to Taos for the winter. Titus discovers that two ex-friends who stole his catch 10 years before are still alive and he sets out to wreak his revenge. Josiah travels with him to St. Louis where old M. LeClerc has plotted for years to avenge his son’s death at Josiah’s hands. The LeClerc tale has nice gothic possibilities but ends in soggy sentimentality. Despite much gory detail about skinning game, killing Indians (about three dozen of various tribes are dispatched) and minute descriptions of life in old St. Louis and on the frontier, the book founders under writing that is repetitious, fatuous and occasionally just bad: ” . . . the annual affair came but once a year.” Paperback rights to Bantam; Preferred Choice Book Plan alternate.
Copyright 1988 Reed Business Information, Inc. –This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

One-Eyed Dream is the final volume in Terry C. Johnston’s exciting trilogy of the rugged trappers and mountain men, Indian fighters, and hardy pioneers who battled for the future of this land–and won.

High in the Rockies lay the Bayou Salade, a lush beaver-rich valley so untouched that the few white men who had seen it called it paradise. But for Scratch Bass, his young partner Josiah Paddock, and the two Indian women they loved, this paradise would open up a hell of violence. Pursued by a vengeful Arapaho raiding party, Scratch will lead his small band through a flurry of arrows all the way to Taos itself. Yet the trail of blood will not end there. For in St. Louis an old enemy waits, and the time is ripe for Scratch to settle a ten-year score. Through the desert known as the Journey of Death to the rough-and-tumble town of St. Louis, Scratch and Josiah will defy the wilderness to bury the past–and a blackhearted killer–once and for all.

One-Eyed Dream










  • 16 responses to "One-Eyed Dream Bantam Terry C. Johnston"

  • Matt Blazzer
    2:30 on April 29th, 2013
    Reply to comment

    Terry C Johnston has done a great job on the Titus Bass series. Very period detail correct. He makes you feel like your in the mountains riding along with Ol’ Scratch and Josh.

  • Fake tim.hobbes
    3:19 on April 29th, 2013
    Reply to comment

    I have purchased the complete Plainsmen Series Books by Terry C Johnston. And I have never more enjoyed these Historical/Novels and I’m 70 years old. I can completely and wholeheartedly recommend the reading of Mr. Johnston.s Books, not only “Carry the Wind”.
    I’m truly sorry that he passed away in 2001 and that was the end of a wonderful author.
    Richard Reupert, Snohomish WA

  • Kyle H
    4:58 on April 29th, 2013
    Reply to comment

    I feel Scratch had to have closure on the past as he had to find out the three men he first road with had in deed betrayed him and took his firs and left him to fend for his self. I am glad Scratch found the men and set things right. We need more of Titus C. Bass pleasd don’t let him fade into the sunset.

  • loneman
    7:29 on April 29th, 2013
    Reply to comment

    Carry The Wind introduces the reader to grizzled mountain man Titus “Scratch” Bass who befriends young Josiah Paddock. Johnston weaves a detailed saga of the encounters of these two in the rough western country of 1831 North America. The novel is fantastically researched and character development is sensational. Johnston’s knowledge of mountain man survival and Native American customs and language borders on scholarly and is worth the read for this fact alone.

    I really enjoyed being transported to the era of the mountain men, quite a drift away from tradional Westerns. My only negative comment is that the novel seems to drag at times, especially when Bass and Paddock are travelling between plot lines, and as such is a bit too long-winded. Perhaps Johnston intended for the reader to feel the slowness and isolation of the mountain men when travelling from Point A to B. Regardless, Carry The Wind is an excellent work, especially considering this was Johnston’s first work (the author sadly passed away last year).

    I plan on reading Johnston’s “mountain men” works as well as his other titles as well. Overall, Carry The Wind is a great historical read if you have the time and interest in this period of American History.

  • Kim Randall
    10:08 on April 29th, 2013
    Reply to comment

    I have to concur with most of my fellow reviewers, this is a great read and not only for the adventure.

    The detail of life and events in the early 1830s is remarkable. There have been other authors who have
    described rendezvous as part of their story line, but Johnston goes to such detail that he makes a reader
    feel that he is actually there. The word pictures are absolutely fantastic!

    A few points of contention with the other reviewers: This book is not the first Titus Bass novel, and it fits very
    well with the beginning story of Titus where he runs away from home, becomes a blacksmith and eventually gets to the mountains of the West. Then, he continues in his adventures following recovery from a scalping and matures in his trade, beaver trapping, in the second book.

    Josiah Paddock does not run away in the usual sense, but rather flees his eastern home after killing a man who had challenged him to a duel. He is a man, although young, and his skills in certain areas, namely kickfighting and throwing a knife accurately will be very useful as the story unfolds.

    The latter part of this book is one of constant wondering – one is tempted to read ahead to find out how it turns out.

    I highly recommend this book to anyone who loves great western fiction, especially of the pre-Civil War time in our nation.

    Until reading the reviews, however, I was unaware that there are actually 9 books in this series.

  • dhollings
    14:54 on April 29th, 2013
    Reply to comment

    Reading “Carry the Wind”, as with any Terry C. Johnston book, takes the reader on an adventurous journey to a time and place in which men battle nature, the great predators of the wilderness, and each other. “Carry the Wind” is the first of a nine book series about mountain man Titus Bass. Bass, also known as “Scratch” in the books, comes upon young Josiah Paddock who has fled St. Louis and a charge of murder for the Rocky Mountains and the chance at becoming a mountain man. Bass soon mentors Paddock and the two set out for rendezvous and a wealth of other adventures.

    Other reviewers have listed Johnston’s writing as “long-winded” and I will agree that he goes into detail not only about his characters but also about the weapons they use, the geography of the land, and the history that they became a part of. For me, it was not tedious writing. Instead, I soon became aware of the significance all of the information presented and how it related to establishing a strong sense of time and place. I savor each of Johnston’s books, but especially the nine-book Titus Bass series because I can easily imagine sitting next to a warm, crackling fire on a cold winter night and having old Scratch himself come in and recount the adventures he has been through.

    Johnston’s narrative moves quickly and the characters seem real. Titus Bass is a character of mythical proportion yet has his faults and his sensitivities as we all do. Johnston truly is the master story teller and you simply can’t go wrong with “Carry the Wind”, the book has it all-history, action, violence, geography, and a damn good story that will leave you wanting more.

  • Just peeved
    21:17 on April 29th, 2013
    Reply to comment

    Terry Johnston is one of my favorite western writers. I believe if he was still alive he would be writing wonderful stories like this one. Be sure to start at the begining of this series of the story of Titus Bass and Josiha and follow these fictional trappers intertwind with non-fiction events and people. I travel a lot and am not able to read other than on the plane and pick up the story any time I pick the book up.
    The next book in this series is Borderlords followed by, One Eyed Dream, Ride the Moon Down, and finally Wind Walker. Enjoy!

  • Qiana Herner
    23:47 on April 29th, 2013
    Reply to comment

    Following Scratch and Josiah through the Rocky mountains is one of the greatest adventures I’ve ever encountered in fiction. I felt like I was there with them and really understand the joys and hardships they encountered. One of the best books I have ever read!!!!!!

  • thebob
    6:45 on April 30th, 2013
    Reply to comment

    Why do authors feel compelled to stretch out their books to inordinate lengths? There are some books — “War and Peace” — that deserve long, lengthy treatment. Others are just padded — and that applies to “Carry the Wind.” The novel is 700 pages long. It would be better if the author had cut it back to 400-450 pages.

    Well, amidst this over-wordy novel is a good story and a lot of authentic information about the days of the Mountain Men — ca. 1832 — perhaps the most heroic and adventurous, although unwashed, characters in American history. The novel is worth reading for its description of buffalo hunts, Indian fights and homely crafts like moccasin making, beaver skinning, etc. I especially enjoyed the author’s description of the Battle of Pierre’s Hole, a real event.

    The plot of “Carry the Wind” is pretty basic. Young man (Josiah Paddock) gets in trouble and runs away to the mountains where he meets old trapper (only 38 years old!) “Scratch” also known as Titus Bass. Old trapper initiates young man into the ways of the Mountain Men. The ending is pretty exciting although too drawn out by half. I admire the author more for his research and dedication to authenticity than I do his merits as a novelist.

  • Wanner
    12:50 on April 30th, 2013
    Reply to comment

    Terry C. Johnston must have done an incredible amount of research to be able to recreate the Rocky Mountain fur trade as practiced by the “mountain men” of the early 19th century. This is the first of six (so far) Titus Bass novels, and I suppose it is still my favorite. Chronologically, this book would be the fourth in the series, but Johnson wrote it first, and I agree that it seems the best place to start. But if I only credit Johnston for his historical research and attention to detail, I’m neglecting to mention what a truly wonderful writer he is. He keeps you deeply involved in the story and makes you want to keep reading. The constant struggle for survival in that place and time makes for very exciting reading, as Titus (also known as “Scratch”)is always having to get out of some jam involving angry Blackfeet warriors or perhaps a four-legged predator. If you have any love at all for the spirit and freedom of the mountain man’s way of life and the incredible skill/luck it took to survive this lifestyle, then by all means give this book a read. Then read the other five books in the series. You’ll thank me!

  • Jayson
    13:57 on April 30th, 2013
    Reply to comment

    Titus Bass, an ‘old’ (early 30′s!!) trapper in the early part of the 19th Century befriends and partners with a young runaway from St Louis, Josiah Paddock, a young man with a chequered past, running from modern life. They endure indescribable hardships, experience a wonderful friendship and partnership, experience trials of mountain life that leave the reader wondering ‘how-on-earth’?

    Brutal, yet tender. Violent, yet gentle. Leaves the reader wondering what adventures these two mismatched men can endure.

    A great adventure.

  • Jew Mark
    17:55 on April 30th, 2013
    Reply to comment

    Author Terry Johnston tells a rivoting story of hard living and free spirits in the American West during one of the greatest periods of our history. I’ve traveled to many of the places he describes in his book and know he has as well. His descriptions of the people paint a picture that will be relived in my mind for many years to come.

  • Mike Pavulack
    20:53 on April 30th, 2013
    Reply to comment

    i believe he depicts the old west just as it was. he mixes fiction with fact brilliantly. love titus bass stories and also custer stories. you can see how the indians really got a raw deal. you really get a feel for those times.

  • BingLuvr
    22:15 on April 30th, 2013
    Reply to comment

    Equal to any if not the best book I have ever read. A unique gift and presentation by the author.

  • john kim
    3:29 on May 1st, 2013
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    This book arrived looking just as nice as a brand new one, even though it was listed as, “Used.” Very pleased and would highly recommend this seller!

  • tired
    12:24 on May 1st, 2013
    Reply to comment

    I wish the author put some more emphasis on Josiah Paddock and the Flathead Indian girl he slept with. She would’ve made a good wife for him and it was obvious he was interested in her, not just a one night stand.

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