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Medieval Architecture in Western Europe: From A.D. 300 to 1500 Includes CD Robert G. Calkins Oxford University Press USA


14th June 2013 History Books 0 Comments

“This survey of 1200 years of Western medieval architecture will become a standard introductory text. Calkin’s concise descriptions of individual monuments will expand students’ understanding and appreciation of the subject. The book offers a remarkable overview of the diversity of building in the period. The photographs and ground plans provide superb visual documentation.”–Deborah Kahn, Boston University

“Fills a gap that has existed for quite some time. The monuments are judiciously selected, and the material is up to date for a survey. The CD is great for our electronic classroom.”–Harry Titus, Wake Forest University

“Clear, compact exposition, well chosen illustrations, clearly reproduced, splendid bibliography. I like the support given by the footnotes, which will encourage further reading.”–John M. Schnurrenberg, University of Alabama at Birmingham

Robert G. Calkins is a History of Art Professor at Cornell University. He has considerable experience with medieval architecture, having written two other books on this subject, Monuments of Medieval Art and Illuminated Books of the Middle Ages.

For the first time, instructors of Medieval Architecture have a selective survey that obviates the need to piece together teaching material from several sources. Medieval Architecture in Western Europe: From A.D. 300 to 1500 presents a selection of major monuments of Medieval European architecture in a single volume. Beginning with a study of structural antecedents found in late Roman architecture, the author examines Early Christian borrowings and transformations and selected representative types of Byzantine buildings. The following chapters cover the development of the monastic complex, traditional forms of Northern timber construction, and the contributions of the Carolingian and Ottonian empires. Spanish structures from the seventh century through the tenth century set the stage for the development of the Romanesque style, examined in its various regional manifestations. After identifying the structural sources of Gothic architecture, the author presents the evolving regional Gothic styles, Late Gothic elaborations and innovations, and representative types of secular architecture. The text concludes with an informative chapter on medieval building practices and the tradition of the Master Mason.
Medieval Architecture in Western Europe: From A.D. 300 to 1500 is thoroughly illustrated with plans, sections, diagrams, and photographs, and also includes an IBM-compatible CD-ROM, featuring over 800 supplementary views and details of the buildings discussed, all in color. Filling the gap between general surveys of architectural history and specialized works on specific periods and regions, this book is ideal for introductory courses in Medieval Architecture, but will also satisfy any reader with an interest in the Middle Ages.

“This survey of 1200 years of Western medieval architecture will become a standard introductory text. Calkin’s concise descriptions of individual monuments will expand students’ understanding and appreciation of the subject. The book offers a remarkable overview of the diversity of building in the period. The photographs and ground plans provide superb visual documentation.”–Deborah Kahn, Boston University

“Fills a gap that has existed for quite some time. The monuments are judiciously selected, and the material is up to date for a survey. The CD is great for our electronic classroom.”–Harry Titus, Wake Forest University

“Clear, compact exposition, well chosen illustrations, clearly reproduced, splendid bibliography. I like the support given by the footnotes, which will encourage further reading.”–John M. Schnurrenberg, University of Alabama at Birmingham

Medieval Architecture in Western Europe: From A.D. 300 to 1500 Includes CD

Early Medieval Architecture

Medieval architecture brings to mind Gothic cathedrals and fortified castles. But those styles were developed from earlier traditions, as detailed by Stalley (history of art, Trinity Coll., Dublin). Covering the period 313-1200 C.E., Stalley discusses the influence of early Christianity prior to the emergence of the Gothic style. He examines stylistic periods as well as the elements of engineering and construction, the cooperative efforts of builder and patron, and the broad categories of secular and church structures. Photographs of buildings, diagrams, and period art tie in well with the text. Though the focus is specialized, Stalley’s book is inviting to both students and general readers. This fine addition to Oxford’s series, neatly written and presented, is recommended for public and academic libraries.
-Karen Ellis, Nicholson Memorial Lib. Syst., Garland, TX
Copyright 2000 Reed Business Information, Inc.

The early middle ages were an exciting period in the history of European architecture, culminating in the development of the Romanesque style. Major architectural innovations were made during this time including the medieval castle, the church spire, and the monastic cloister. By avoiding the traditional emphasis on chronological development, Roger Stalley provides a radically new approach to the subject, exploring issues and themes rather than sequences and dates. In addition to analysing the language of the Romanesque, the book examines the engineering achievements of the builders, focusing on how the great monuments of the age were designed and constructed. Ranging from Gotland to Apulia, Stalley explores the richness and variety of European architecture in terms of the social and religious aspirations of the time. Symbolic meanings associated with architecture are also thoroughly investigated. Written with style and humour, the lively text includes many quotations from ancient sources, providing fascinating insight into the way that medieval buildings were created, and in the process enlivening study of this period.

Early Medieval Architecture (Oxford History of Art)










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