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Japan at War: An Oral History Asia Japan Haruko Taya Cook New Press The


31st January 2012 History Books 0 Comments

One of the essential books about World War II. — Philadelphia Inquirer

Oral history of a compellingly high order. — Kirkus Reviews

Haruko Taya Cook is Fordham Marymount Professor Emerita in history at Marymount College of Fordham University. Theodore F. Cook is a professor of Japanese history at William Paterson University. They live in New York City.

A timely fifteenth Anniversary reissue of a “deeply moving book” (Studs Terkel) that portrays the Japanese experience during World War II in all its complexity.

Following the release of Clint Eastwood’s epic film Letters from Iwo Jima, which was nominated for the Oscar for Best Picture, there has been a renewed fascination and interest in the Japanese perspective on World War II. This pathbreaking work of oral history is the first book ever to capturein either Japanese or Englishthe experience of ordinary Japanese people during the war.

In a sweeping panorama, Haruko Taya Cook and Theodore F. Cook take us from the Japanese attacks on China in the 1930s to the Japanese home front during the inhuman raids on Tokyo, Hiroshima, and Nagasaki, offering the first glimpses of how the twentieth century’s most deadly conflict affected the lives of the Japanese population. The book “seeks out the true feelings of the wartime generation [and] illuminates the contradictions between the official views of the war and living testimony” (Yomiuri Shimbun, Japan).

Japan at War is a book to which Americans and Japanese will continue to turn for decades to come. With more than 30,000 copies sold to date, this new paperback edition features an updated cover designed to appeal to a new generation of readers.

One of the essential books about World War II. — Philadelphia Inquirer

Oral history of a compellingly high order. — Kirkus Reviews

Japan at War: An Oral History

A Modern History of Japan: From Tokugawa Times to the Present

A Chinese saying has it that “each step changes the mountain.” Likewise, each major turn in history changes how we understand what went before: as Japan now continues in an economic funk that followed but did not wipe out the “economic miracle” of the postwar period, we need to rethink our histories once again to explain the origins of prosperity, the evolution of what it means to be Japanese, and the roots of obstinacy. Gordon’s clearheaded, readable, and inquisitive narrative, aimed at students and serious general readers, accomplishes this task molto con brio. Head of Harvard’s Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies, Gordon tells a sweeping and provocative story of Japan’s political, economic, social, and cultural inventions of its modernity in evolving international contexts, incorporating inside viewpoints and debates. Beyond identifying the national stages (feudalism, militarism, democracy), the author innovatively emphasizes how labor unions, cultural figures, and groups in society (especially women) have been affected over time and have responded. Recommended both for general libraries and for specialist collections.
Charles W. Hayford, Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL
Copyright 2002 Reed Business Information, Inc. –This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

A Modern History of Japan: From Tokugawa Times to the Present, Second Edition, paints a richly nuanced and strikingly original portrait of the last two centuries of Japanese history. It takes students from the days of the shogunate–the feudal overlordship of the Tokugawa family–through the modernizing revolution launched by midlevel samurai in the late nineteenth century; the adoption of Western hairstyles, clothing, and military organization; and the nation’s first experiments with mass democracy after World War I. Author Andrew Gordon offers the finest synthesis to date of Japan’s passage through militarism, World War II, the American occupation, and the subsequent economic rollercoaster.
The true ingenuity and value of Gordon’s approach lies in his close attention to the non-elite layers of society. Here students will see the influence of outside ideas, products, and culture on home life, labor unions, political parties, gender relations, and popular entertainment. The book examines Japan’s struggles to define the meaning of its modernization, from villages and urban neighborhoods, to factory floors and middle managers’ offices, to the imperial court. Most importantly, it illuminates the interconnectedness of Japanese developments with world history, demonstrating how Japan’s historical passage represents a variation of a process experienced by many nations and showing how the Japanese narrative forms one part of the interwoven fabric of modern history. This second edition incorporates increased coverage of both Japan’s role within East Asia–particularly with China, Korea, and Manchuria–as well as expanded discussions of cultural and intellectual history.
With a sustained focus on setting modern Japan in a comparative and global context, A Modern History of Japan, Second Edition, is ideal for undergraduate courses in modern Japanese history, Japanese politics, Japanese society, or Japanese culture.

A Modern History of Japan: From Tokugawa Times to the Present










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