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Ion Bratianu: Romania: The Peace Conferences of 1919-23 and Their Aftermath Europe Romania Keith Hitchin Haus Publishing


8th July 2013 History Books 0 Comments

Keith Hitchin: Keith Hitchin is Professor of History at the University of Illinois. Amongst his more recent books is Rumania, 1866-1947, in the Oxford History of Modern Europe series (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1994). He is currently at work on a History of Southeastern Europe, 1352- 1807, for the Oxford History of Early Modern Europe, and A Concise History of Romania for Cambridge University Press.


In 1916 Romania was promised the whole of Transylvania in return for its entry into the war. Insisting on the fulfillment of this promise at Versailles, Ion Bratianu had a strained relationship with the Great Powers, which worsened after Romania’s invasion of Hungary. However, they later signed and adhered to treaties with Austria, Bulgaria, and Hungary.

Ion Bratianu: Romania: The Peace Conferences of 1919-23 and Their Aftermath (Makers of the Modern World)

Ignacy Paderewski, Poland: Makers of the Modern World

Anita Prazmowska is Professor in International History at the London School of Economics, where she has taught since 1992. Her main fields of research interest lie in the Cold War; communism; contemporary history;Eastern Europe; fascism; and Poland.

Poland’s sovereignty as an independent state was secured at the Paris Conference by Ignacy Paderewski, an acquaintance of Woodrow Wilson. He was later blamed for being excessively confident that the Great Powers, to whom he entrusted Poland’s future, would look after the nation’s interests.

Ignacy Paderewski, Poland: Makers of the Modern World










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