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Heart of Darkness Aziloth Books Joseph Conrad


3rd March 2013 Literature & Fiction 0 Comments

Joseph Conrad was born in 1857 at Berdyczw in the Ukraine. Orphaned at the age of eleven, he left home at 16 to seek his fortune on the sea. He led an adventurous life, surviving gun-running, shipwreck and a stint as captain of a Congo steamboat. It was this latter venture which opened his eyes to the abuses of colonial power and the darker side of imperialism. These insights and experiences inform the plot and characters of Heart of Darkness, a chilling condemnation of the hypocrisy of imperial rhetoric, where the ‘bringing of civilization’ to ‘benighted natives’ hides the true extent of oppression, exploitation and hideous cruelty.

Novella by Joseph Conrad, first published in 1902 with the story “Youth” and thereafter published separately. The story reflects the physical and psychological shock Conrad himself experienced in 1890, when he worked briefly in the Belgian Congo. The narrator, Marlow, describes a journey he took on an African river. Assigned by an ivory company to take command of a cargo boat stranded in the interior, Marlow makes his way through the treacherous forest, witnessing the brutalization of the natives by white traders and hearing tantalizing stories of a Mr. Kurtz, the company’s most successful representative. He reaches Kurtz’s compound in a remote outpost only to see a row of human heads mounted on poles. In this alien context, unbound by the strictures of his own culture, Kurtz has exchanged his soul for a bloody sovereignty, but a mortal illness is bringing his reign of terror to a close. As Marlow transports him downriver, Kurtz delivers an arrogant and empty explanation of his deeds as a visionary quest. To the narrator Kurtz’s dying words, “The horror! The horror!” represent despair at the encounter with human depravity–the heart of darkness. — The Merriam-Webster Encyclopedia of Literature –This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Founded in 1906 by J.M. Dent, the Everyman Library has always tried to make the best books ever written available to the greatest number of people at the lowest possible price. Unique editorial features that help Everyman Paperback Classics stand out from the crowd include: a leading scholar or literary critic’s introduction to the text, a biography of the author, a chronology of her or his life and times, a historical selection of criticism, and a concise plot summary. All books published since 1993 have also been completely restyled: all type has been reset, to offer a clarity and ease of reading unique among editions of the classics; a vibrant, full-color cover design now complements these great texts with beautiful contemporary works of art. But the best feature must be Everyman’s uniquely low price. Each Everyman title offers these extensive materials at a price that competes with the most inexpensive editions on the market-but Everyman Paperbacks have durable binding, quality paper, and the highest editorial and scholarly standards. –This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

Novella by Joseph Conrad, first published in 1902 with the story “Youth” and thereafter published separately. The story reflects the physical and psychological shock Conrad himself experienced in 1890, when he worked briefly in the Belgian Congo. The narrator, Marlow, describes a journey he took on an African river. Assigned by an ivory company to take command of a cargo boat stranded in the interior, Marlow makes his way through the treacherous forest, witnessing the brutalization of the natives by white traders and hearing tantalizing stories of a Mr. Kurtz, the company’s most successful representative. He reaches Kurtz’s compound in a remote outpost only to see a row of human heads mounted on poles. In this alien context, unbound by the strictures of his own culture, Kurtz has exchanged his soul for a bloody sovereignty, but a mortal illness is bringing his reign of terror to a close. As Marlow transports him downriver, Kurtz delivers an arrogant and empty explanation of his deeds as a visionary quest. To the narrator Kurtz’s dying words, “The horror! The horror!” represent despair at the encounter with human depravity–the heart of darkness. — The Merriam-Webster Encyclopedia of Literature –This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Heart of Darkness (Cathedral Classics)










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