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Flying Tiger: International Relations Theory and the Politics of Advanced Weapons Ulrich Krotz Oxford University Press USA


22nd May 2013 History Books 0 Comments

“Flying Tiger is a truly extraordinary book, which will soon be considered a classic and essential to the canons of international relations theory and European politics. It is a model for combining brilliant, insightful theorizing with painstaking, detailed empirical narration. While many see high politics as contributing to the uncertain future or even outright failure of the European project, Krotz uncovers, theorizes, and explains a successful effort at bilateral development and production of advanced weaponry. This is, as Krotz puts it, ‘a different sort of European integration,’ but integration nonetheless.”–Rawi Abdelal, Professor of Business Administration Harvard Business School

“On the face of things, Flying Tiger is about helicopter production, but as one reads further in this impressively original book, it is obvious that Ulrich Krotz’s concerns are with much more than cooperation between France and Germany. In detailing the many ups and downs this highly symbolic flying machine has encountered over the course of decades, the author is really telling a much larger story, one that goes to the heart of the ongoing challenge of ‘building’ Europe. In crisp and clear prose, and drawing skillfully upon international relations theory, Krotz provides invaluable insight into the current state and future prospects of European security and defense cooperation.”–David G. Haglund, Professor of International Relations, Queen’s University, Canada

“This ambitious volume draws on the very best traditions of empirical research and meticulous analysis. Its arguments about and evidence on the interconnections of the domestic, bilateral and multilateral layers of policy deserve to be widely read.”–Helen Wallace, Centennial Professor, European Institute, London School of Economics and Political Science

Ulrich Krotz is Assistant Professor of Political Science at Brown University. He has also taught at Oxford University, and has held research positions at Harvard University, the European University Institute, and Princeton University.

The rivalry between Germany and France in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries is well known. It was directly or indirectly responsible for four cataclysmic wars, and until recently, the idea that these two states could become close partners seemed implausible. Yet, following World War II and the birth of the European Union, they became the closest of allies. In fact, they collaborated for almost four decades on one of the most sophisticated weapons that Europe has produced: the Tiger Helicopter. How did this occur, and what does this unlikely outcome tell us about how interstate relations really work?

Through the lens of the Tiger, Ulrich Krotz draws from two theoretical approaches–social constructivism and historical institutionalism–to reframe our understanding of how international relationships evolve. How does a relationship between states affect a state internally? And how do the internal dynamics of a state limit such relationships? While other scholars have touched on these issues, until now no one has provided a sustained, finely–grained, and historically–informed analysis that explains how international relations inform domestic realities and how, in turn, domestic politics and institutions structure interstate relationships. Two famous rivals reshaped their relationship through a complicated, decades-long process, and in doing so, the nuts and bolts of domestic politics-approvals for state funding, or laws regarding corporations and technology transfer, for instance-were instrumental in creating a new reality.

Fully researched in French, German, and English, Krotz’s account of how the Tiger project was conceived and funded, and how the combat helicopter was built and exported, presents a clear analysis of the dialectical relationship between ‘high’ interstate politics and ‘low’ domestic politics. In sum, it is a groundbreaking theoretical contribution to international relations scholarship.

“Flying Tiger is a truly extraordinary book, which will soon be considered a classic and essential to the canons of international relations theory and European politics. It is a model for combining brilliant, insightful theorizing with painstaking, detailed empirical narration. While many see high politics as contributing to the uncertain future or even outright failure of the European project, Krotz uncovers, theorizes, and explains a successful effort at bilateral development and production of advanced weaponry. This is, as Krotz puts it, ‘a different sort of European integration,’ but integration nonetheless.”–Rawi Abdelal, Professor of Business Administration Harvard Business School

“On the face of things, Flying Tiger is about helicopter production, but as one reads further in this impressively original book, it is obvious that Ulrich Krotz’s concerns are with much more than cooperation between France and Germany. In detailing the many ups and downs this highly symbolic flying machine has encountered over the course of decades, the author is really telling a much larger story, one that goes to the heart of the ongoing challenge of ‘building’ Europe. In crisp and clear prose, and drawing skillfully upon international relations theory, Krotz provides invaluable insight into the current state and future prospects of European security and defense cooperation.”–David G. Haglund, Professor of International Relations, Queen’s University, Canada

“This ambitious volume draws on the very best traditions of empirical research and meticulous analysis. Its arguments about and evidence on the interconnections of the domestic, bilateral and multilateral layers of policy deserve to be widely read.”–Helen Wallace, Centennial Professor, European Institute, London School of Economics and Political Science

Flying Tiger: International Relations Theory and the Politics of Advanced Weapons

Democracy’s Arsenal: Creating a Twenty-First-Century Defense Industry

Jacques S. Gansler is the author of the influential books The Defense Industry (1980), Affording Defense (1989), and Defense Conversion: Transforming the Arsenal of Democracy (1996), all published by the MIT Press. He is currently Professor and Roger C. Lipitz Chair, School of Public Policy, University of Maryland, and served as Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition Technology, and Logistics from 1997 to 2001.

An expert explains why the security needs of the twenty-first century require a transformation of the defense industry of the twentieth century.

Democracy’s Arsenal: Creating a Twenty-First-Century Defense Industry










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