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First Force Recon Company: Sunrise at Midnight History World 20th Century Bill Peters Ballantine Books


23rd October 2012 History Books 0 Comments

In 1st Force Recon you performed at a very high level of proficiency. Or you died. . . .

In 1969, First Lieutenant Bill Peters and the Force Recon Marines had one of the most difficult, dangerous assignments in Vietnam. From the DMZ to the Central Highlands, their job was to provide strategic and operational intelligence to insure the security of American units as the withdrawal of the troops progressed.

Making perilous helicopter inserts deep in the Que Son Mountains, where the constant chatter of AK-47 rifle fire left no doubt who was in charge, Peters and the other men of 1st Force Recon Company risked their lives every day in six-man teams, never knowing whether they would live to see the sunset. Peters’s accounts of silently watching huge movements of heavily armed NVA regulars, prisoner snatches, sudden-death ambushes, and extracts from fiercely fought firefights vividly capture the realities of Recon Marine warfare, and offer a gritty tribute to the courage, heroism, and sacrifice of the U. S. Marines. . . .

Dr. Bill Peters was born and raised forty miles east of San Francisco in the Livermore Valley. He attended San Francisco State University in the late sixties, where he was a star linebacker for their Far Western Conference championship football team. In 1967, Peters joined the San Francisco State football coaching staff and helped the nationally ranked team capture a postseason bowl game victory.

Bill Peters was commissioned in the Marines via Officer Candidate School. After completing the Basic School at Quantico, Virginia, in 1969, he was assigned to Vietnam as a Force Recon platoon commander, where he conducted twenty-three long-range patrols in enemy-controlled territory. His personal awards include a Silver Star, two Bronze Stars, one with V (for valor), and a Purple Heart.

In addition to a B.A. degree from San Francisco State University, Dr. Peters has a California Life-Time Credential in Education, a Masters of Divinity, and a Ph.D. in psychology. He is currently producing a weekly television program devoted to stories of our national war heroes. Bill lives in Southern California with his wife, Barbara, and their two sons, Tony and Paul.

In 1st Force Recon you performed at a very high level of proficiency. Or you died. . . .

In 1969, First Lieutenant Bill Peters and the Force Recon Marines had one of the most difficult, dangerous assignments in Vietnam. From the DMZ to the Central Highlands, their job was to provide strategic and operational intelligence to insure the security of American units as the withdrawal of the troops progressed.

Making perilous helicopter inserts deep in the Que Son Mountains, where the constant chatter of AK-47 rifle fire left no doubt who was in charge, Peters and the other men of 1st Force Recon Company risked their lives every day in six-man teams, never knowing whether they would live to see the sunset. Peters’s accounts of silently watching huge movements of heavily armed NVA regulars, prisoner snatches, sudden-death ambushes, and extracts from fiercely fought firefights vividly capture the realities of Recon Marine warfare, and offer a gritty tribute to the courage, heroism, and sacrifice of the U. S. Marines. . . .

First Force Recon Company: Sunrise at Midnight

Force Recon Command

THE A SHAU VALLEYWHERE THE NVA WAS KING . . .
In order to prevent surprise attacks on U.S. forces as they were pulling out of Vietnam, someone had to be able to pinpoint the NVA’s movements. That dangerous job was the assignment of then-major Alex Lee and the Marines of the 3rd Force Reconnaissance Company when he assumed command in late 1969. They became the tip of the spear for Lt. Gen. Herman Nickerson’s III MAF. And each time one of Lee’s small, well-motivated, well-led, and wildly outnumbered teams was airlifted into the field, the men never knew if the day would end violently.
But whether tracking NVA movements, recovering downed air crews, or making bomb-damage assessments after B-52 strikes, Major Lee’s Few Good Men never forgot who they were: Each of them was in Vietnam to live like a Marine, win like a Marine, and, if need be, die like a Marine.
Forthright and unabashed, Lieutenant Colonel Lee leaves no controversy untouched and no awe-inspiring tale untold in this gripping account of 3rd Force Recon’s self-sacrifice and heroic achievement in the face of overwhelming odds.

THE A SHAU VALLEYWHERE THE NVA WAS KING . . .
In order to prevent surprise attacks on U.S. forces as they were pulling out of Vietnam, someone had to be able to pinpoint the NVA’s movements. That dangerous job was the assignment of then-major Alex Lee and the Marines of the 3rd Force Reconnaissance Company when he assumed command in late 1969. They became the tip of the spear for Lt. Gen. Herman Nickerson’s III MAF. And each time one of Lee’s small, well-motivated, well-led, and wildly outnumbered teams was airlifted into the field, the men never knew if the day would end violently.
But whether tracking NVA movements, recovering downed air crews, or making bomb-damage assessments after B-52 strikes, Major Lee’s Few Good Men never forgot who they were: Each of them was in Vietnam to live like a Marine, win like a Marine, and, if need be, die like a Marine.
Forthright and unabashed, Lieutenant Colonel Lee leaves no controversy untouched and no awe-inspiring tale untold in this gripping account of 3rd Force Recon’s self-sacrifice and heroic achievement in the face of overwhelming odds.

Force Recon Command










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