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Field Guide to the Mammals of the Indian Subcontinent: Where to Watch Mammals in India Nepal Bhutan Bangladesh Sri Lanka and Pakistan Asia Bangladesh K. K. Gurung Academic Press 1st edition


12th January 2013 History Books 2 Comments

* An authoritative and beautifully illustrated field guide to the larger mammals of the Indian subcontinent.
* Includes almost all the species that can be identified in the field easily.
* Concise descriptions of each species, including identification, habitat, range, behaviour, diet, breeding, status, and similar species.
* Describes and maps all the finest national parks and protected areas in the subcontinent, specially chosen for superior mammal watching.
* Tracks of a selection of mammals to aid their identification in the field.

K.K. Gurung has a keen interest in the mammals of the Indian subcontinent and is the author of Heart of the Jungle, the definitive book on the wildlife of Royal Chitwan National Park, Nepal.

Raj Singh has led natural history tours in the Indian subcontinent since the mid 1970s and is a regular visitor to its natural parks. He is the author of Bird and Wildlife Sanctuaries of India, Nepal, and Bhutan.

This book is a field guide to the mammals of this unique subcontinent and includes the best places to watch them. It describes each of the 100 plus species that can be recognized in the field, including identification, habitat, range, behavior, diet, breeding, status, and similar species. The Field Guide also contains color illustrations of each mammal as well as tracks of the more prominent species, and mammal lists and maps for each national park.

Key Features
* The only current guide to mammals of the region
* Contains color pictures and full text on the 106 larger species likely to be encountered
* Includes drawings of tracks of key species to aid identification
* Presents full details of 23 parks and reserves, with location maps, visiting details and species lists for each
* An authoritative and beautifully illustrated field guide to the larger mammals of the Indian subcontinent.
* Includes almost all the species that can be identified in the field easily.
* Concise descriptions of each species, including identification, habitat, range, behaviour, diet, breeding, status, and similar species.
* Describes and maps all the finest national parks and protected areas in the subcontinent, specially chosen for superior mammal watching.
* Tracks of a selection of mammals to aid their identification in the field

Field Guide to the Mammals of the Indian Subcontinent: Where to Watch Mammals in India, Nepal, Bhutan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, and Pakistan (Natural World)

Mammals of India

This slim volume by Menon (executive director, Wildlife Trust of India) contains an extraordinary amount of information. Intended as a field guide for the nonprofessional, it fulfills that role well. — Choice

This is an excellent and much needed modern guide. It might not be detailed enough for a serious researcher, but it is great for the visitor. It is easy to use, with a lot of quality information packed into a book that only measures 21.5 x 14 x 1 cms. . . . Buy the book and visit India soon. — Roy John, Canadian Field Naturalist

Mammals of India is . . . a useful introduction to the large variety of mammals inhabiting the Indian subcontinent and the waters around its shores. For first-time visitors it provides a taste of the mammalian fauna of the country and where specific animals might be expected to be found. I know of no other pocket guide that fills this niche. — James A. Matteoni, Discovery

The vast and beautiful Indian subcontinent is home to an incredibly rich diversity of mammals, including mighty tigers, elephants, and rhinos, as well as primates, pandas, hyenas, and many more. Mammals of India is the most comprehensive and field-ready illustrated guide to Indian mammals available. It covers 400 species–virtually every mammal known to exist in India–and includes more than 350 full-color photographs as well as 85 color distribution maps for easy reference to India’s largest and most majestic species. The detailed text, written by one of India’s leading wildlife authorities, describes key identification features, biometrics, behavior, and status. There’s also an invaluable section on similar species for hard-to-identify mammals such as bats and rodents. This durable and user-friendly photographic guide is designed especially for use in the field, but it’s also the ideal book for armchair adventurers.

Covers 400 species–virtually every mammal known to exist in India
Includes more than 350 color photographs
Provides an authoritative text describing key identification features and more
Features 85 color distribution maps
Designed especially for field use

Mammals of India (Princeton Field Guides)










  • 2 responses to "Field Guide to the Mammals of the Indian Subcontinent: Where to Watch Mammals in India Nepal Bhutan Bangladesh Sri Lanka and Pakistan Asia Bangladesh K. K. Gurung Academic Press 1st edition"

  • Topgun
    16:32 on January 13th, 2013
    Reply to comment

    This is a great field Guide to the Mammals of India. The layout of the book is easy to follow, has great decriptions of where various Mammals are found across the Country.

  • Nathan T. Lynch
    6:49 on January 14th, 2013
    Reply to comment

    This book covers the land mammals of the Indian Subregion or in other words it cover: India, Nepal, Bhutan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, and Pakistan. However, it also does exclude the smaller and often inconspicious mammals like baths, schrews, and most rodents. A number of small but often conspicious mammals are included. For instance both squirrels and pikas are included. In total it depicts and describes 106 species in deatail. It starts in the typical manner with an introduction to the region, mammals, and mammal observing. This section is highly usefull to the unexperienced reader, but will probably seem quite borring to most, as it is short and only mentiones the most bassal things. The next fourty pages is devoted to the mammal species themselves. This means that there is 2-3 species per page. About each species the book descibes identification, habitat, range (no range maps!), behavior, diet, breeding, status, and similar species. The text is not for pleasure reading, but it is highly usefull in the field. A thing to remember – not mentioned in the book – is that the status refers to subregion only, not the intire world. An example is the Red Deer (Cervus elaphus) which is described as endangered. The next pages are assigned to 12 colour plates with drawings of the mammals. The drawings are not especialy beautiful, but all the important details usefull in identification are remembered. The next 12 plates are devoted to animal tracks. The last third of the book describes 23 national parks/reserves in the region including the famous Chitwan NP and Sunderbars NP. These pages are the highlight of the book. In this part there is a map of each park and a quite thorrow descibtion of acces, accomodation facilities, season to go there, larger mammals of the area etc. Sadly similar chapters in other books have been shown to go quickly out of date. At the end of the book there is a chapter called “futher reading” which obviously seems equal to bibliograpy.

    In total the book seems to be good in the field, but there are quite a few large lacks. For instance a number of large species known in the area are not mentioned at all. An example is the Toque Macaque (Macaca sinica). The Slender Lori (Loris tardigrandus) is mentioned only briefly in “similar species” of the Slow Lori ( Nycticebus coucang). This seems strange as the Slende lori occurs in a much larger part of the subregion. Sadley this is also a fact with a number of other species. They also use a number of outdated latin names. An example is the use of the genus Felis for all the smaller cats. In the beginning of the book they mention that the reason for the use of “old names” is because they are more familiar to people! But they are still incorrect in my opinion (I know other people don’t find them to be so). It is however still a very good and usefull companion when watching wildlife in the region.

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