preload preload preload preload

Brazilian Popular Music and Citizenship Americas South America Brazil Idelber Avelar Duke University Press Books


9th July 2013 History Books 0 Comments

“Idelber Avelar’s and Christopher Dunn’s book is not only an invaluable aid in understanding the complex relationship between culture and politics in Brazil. It also helps us to understand how culture and politics act together in forming our common future, and even suggests ways in which we as citizens might have a hand in determining how things turn out.”—Arto Lindsay, musician and artist

“This book is quite important for understanding the significance of music in Brazil. It shows that music—as a complex social, cultural, artistic, and even political phenomenon—was part and parcel of the constitution of citizenship. Music has been a crucial constitutive factor in Brazilians’ sense of belonging.”—George Yúdice, author of The Expediency of Culture: Uses of Culture in the Global Era

Idelber Avelar is Professor of Spanish and Portuguese at Tulane University. He is the author of The Letter of Violence: Essays on Narrative, Ethics, and Politics and The Untimely Present: Postdictatorial Latin American Fiction and the Task of Mourning, also published by Duke University Press.

Christopher Dunn is Associate Professor of Brazilian literary and cultural studies at Tulane University. He is the author of Brutality Garden: Tropicália and the Emergence of a Brazilian Counterculture and a co-editor of Brazilian Popular Music and Globalization.

Covering more than one hundred years of history, this multidisciplinary collection of essays explores the vital connections between popular music and citizenship in Brazil. While popular music has served as an effective resource for communities to stake claims to political, social, and cultural rights in Brazil, it has also been appropriated by the state in its efforts to manage and control a socially, racially, and geographically diverse nation. The question of citizenship has also been a recurrent theme in the work of many of Brazil’s most important musicians. These essays explore popular music in relation to national identity, social class, racial formations, community organizing, political protest, and emergent forms of distribution and consumption. Contributors examine the cultural politics of samba in the 1930s, the trajectory of middle-class musical sensibility associated with Música Popular Brasileira (MPB), rock and re-democratization in the 1980s, music and black identity in Bahia, hip hop and community organizing in São Paulo, and the repression of baile funk in Rio in the 1990s. Among other topics, they consider the use of music by the Landless Workers’ Movement, the performance of identity by Japanese Brazilian musicians, the mangue beat movement of Recife, and the emergence of new regional styles, such as lambadão and tecnobrega, that circulate outside of conventional distribution channels. Taken together, the essays reveal the important connections between citizenship, national belonging, and Brazilian popular music.

Contributors. Idelber Avelar, Christopher Dunn, João Freire Filho, Goli Guerreiro, Micael Herschmann, Ari Lima, Aaron Lorenz, Shanna Lorenz, Angélica Madeira, Malcolm K. McNee, Frederick Moehn, Flávio Oliveira, Adalberto Paranhos, Derek Pardue, Marco Aurélio Paz Tella, Osmundo Pinho, Carlos Sandroni, Daniel Sharp, Hermano Vianna, Wivian Weller

“Idelber Avelar’s and Christopher Dunn’s book is not only an invaluable aid in understanding the complex relationship between culture and politics in Brazil. It also helps us to understand how culture and politics act together in forming our common future, and even suggests ways in which we as citizens might have a hand in determining how things turn out.”—Arto Lindsay, musician and artist

“This book is quite important for understanding the significance of music in Brazil. It shows that music—as a complex social, cultural, artistic, and even political phenomenon—was part and parcel of the constitution of citizenship. Music has been a crucial constitutive factor in Brazilians’ sense of belonging.”—George Yúdice, author of The Expediency of Culture: Uses of Culture in the Global Era

Brazilian Popular Music and Citizenship

The Brazilian Sound: Samba, Bossa Nova, and the Popular Music of Brazil

Two new books on popular music present contrasting approaches to the diverse world of Hispanic music. Aparicio’s (Spanish and American culture, Univ. of Michigan) work, aimed at an academic audience, deals with salsa and Puerto Rican culture in a feminist context. McGowan, targeting a general audience, presents a comprehensive history of popular music in Brazil. Aparicio analyzes salsa, boleros, and other popular musical forms in terms of cultural issues (race, gender, class), drawing on her own experiences, and those of typical listeners, to explore these issues. Readers may find their views on salsa altered by reading this book. A recommended choice for academic Hispanic studies collections and for music collections with a strong Hispanic emphasis. McGowan and Pessanha here update their original edition (Billboard Bks., 1991), bringing their extensive experience writing on Brazilian popular music for Billboard and other magazines to this extensive survey covering local jazz and rock as well as better-known forms. The accessible writing style and lavish use of illustrations help achieve the authors’ goal of inspiring interest in this music. Updates cover recent music and musicians, provide more social analysis, and expand the discography to 1000 titles, adding much to the original edition. The best work on the topic, this is recommended for both academic and public library music collections.?James E. Ross, WLN, Seattle
Copyright 1997 Reed Business Information, Inc. –This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

Brazilian music has exponentially increased in its popularity over the decade since the last edition of “The Brazilian Sound” was published. This revised and expanded edition includes discussions of developments in samba and other key genres, the rise of female singer-songwriters in recent years, new works by established artists like Milton Nascimento and Gilberto Gil and the mixing of bossa with electronica. This clearly written and lavishly illustrated encyclopaedic survey features dozens of new entries and photographs, an extensive glossary of Brazilian music terms and more. This edition of “The Brazilian Sound” contains new discussions of: musica sertaneja and musica caipira; Brazilian funk and rap/hip-hop; electronic dance music; young contemporary musicians inspired by traditional music; the rise of new samba artists; an updated bibliography and glossary; and, a new list of Web resources.

The Brazilian Sound: Samba, Bossa Nova, and the Popular Music of Brazil










  • Leave a Reply

    * Required
    ** Your Email is never shared