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Art and Life in Renaissance Venice Prentice Hall Patricia Fortini Brown


31st October 2011 History Books 5 Comments

For courses in Renaissance Art. Through close examination of Renaissance paintings, drawings, book illustrations, and other art works, Patricia Fortini Brown brings fourteenth and fifteenth century Venice alive. She explores the role of the guilds and the nobility, the unique island setting, the environment of the church and the private home, the political rivalries with other states, the taste for symbols and metaphors, the myriad qualities that made Venice distinct and its art unique. Carefully interweaving art-historical analysis of individual works (both famous and little-known) with rich contextual discussions, she reveals a culture of high beauty, artifice, and craftsmanship.

“Brown challenges the Tuscan-centred understanding and definition of the term ‘Renaissance’ in her splendid survey.” — The Art Book, January 1998

“sweeps across the social and political worlds of 15th- and 16th-century Venice, embedding works of art in a rich matrix.” — Choice, October 1997 –This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Through close examination of Renaissance paintings, drawings, book illustrations, and other art works, Patricia Fortini Brown brings fourteenthfifteenth century Venice alive. She explores the role of the guilds and the nobility, the unique island setting, the environment of the church and the private home, the political rivalries with other states, the taste for symbols and metaphorsQthe myriad qualities that made Venice distinct and its art unique. Carefully interweaving art-historical analysis of individual works (both famous and little-known) with rich contextual discussions, she reveals a culture of high beauty, artifice, and craftsmanship. –This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

“Brown challenges the Tuscan-centred understanding and definition of the term ‘Renaissance’ in her splendid survey.” — The Art Book, January 1998

“sweeps across the social and political worlds of 15th- and 16th-century Venice, embedding works of art in a rich matrix.” — Choice, October 1997 –This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Art and Life in Renaissance Venice (Reissue)










  • 5 responses to "Art and Life in Renaissance Venice Prentice Hall Patricia Fortini Brown"

  • Andy Goodrich
    14:26 on October 30th, 2011
    Reply to comment

    Mrs. Howard not only describes “the stones” of this city , but illuminate the soul with details of great historic relevance.
    Beacuse of her I learned about the Ruskin’s classic book on
    Venice and the influence of the Arabs on the West.
    This is a very good start point to explore in detail
    (with books and travel) the architectural treasures of
    this dream surounded by water.

  • John Baxter
    17:21 on October 30th, 2011
    Reply to comment

    This book is a great introdcution to Venetian art of the Renaissance, through its views of the major artists of the time (the Bellinis, Titian, Pollaiuolo, Veronese, etc.), but it incorporates enough social, religious, and political history that one not only gets a more-well rounded view of the Venice of the Renaissance, but also is not bogged down in excessive stylistic analysis. This makes Brown’s work a wonderful introduction to the Venetian novice, which many amateur art-historians caught up with Florence and Rome (myself included) tend to be.

  • BroTurk
    13:46 on November 2nd, 2011
    Reply to comment

    Excellent service, prompt delivery, excellent conditon
    as described, packaged well.
    Would use again.

  • J Y Vance
    9:06 on November 3rd, 2011
    Reply to comment

    This little paperback is packed with great information and great pictures. A must have for anyone interested in Renaissance Venice, it’s well-organized and very easy to read.

  • webdiva
    18:36 on November 3rd, 2011
    Reply to comment

    I read this book just prior to visiting the Boston Museum of Fine Arts about 2 years ago to see their special exhibit on three very important artists in Renaissance Venice: Titian, Tintoretto and Veronese. The book was a great help in understanding the period and helped me to appreciate the exhibit and what the artists were trying to show. I wish I had read the book before visiting Venice itself. But, having read the book again after viewing the exhibit at the MFA, I know what I must see the next time I visit Venice, a truly unique and amazing place.

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